(perl #131836) avoid a use-after-free after parsing a "sub" keyword
[perl.git] / Porting / pumpkin.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 Pumpkin - Notes on handling the Perl Patch Pumpkin And Porting Perl
4
5 =head1 SYNOPSIS
6
7 There is no simple synopsis, yet.
8
9 =head1 DESCRIPTION
10
11 This document attempts to begin to describe some of the considerations
12 involved in patching, porting, and maintaining perl.
13
14 This document is still under construction, and still subject to
15 significant changes.  Still, I hope parts of it will be useful,
16 so I'm releasing it even though it's not done.
17
18 For the most part, it's a collection of anecdotal information that
19 already assumes some familiarity with the Perl sources.  I really need
20 an introductory section that describes the organization of the sources
21 and all the various auxiliary files that are part of the distribution.
22
23 =head1 Where Do I Get Perl Sources and Related Material?
24
25 The Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (or CPAN) is the place to go.
26 There are many mirrors, but the easiest thing to use is probably
27 L<http://www.cpan.org/README.html> , which automatically points you to a
28 mirror site "close" to you.
29
30 =head2 Perl5-porters mailing list
31
32 The mailing list perl5-porters@perl.org
33 is the main group working with the development of perl.  If you're
34 interested in all the latest developments, you should definitely
35 subscribe.  The list is high volume, but generally has a
36 fairly low noise level.
37
38 Subscribe by sending the message (in the body of your letter)
39
40         subscribe perl5-porters
41
42 to perl5-porters-request@perl.org .
43
44 Archives of the list are held at:
45
46     http://www.xray.mpe.mpg.de/mailing-lists/perl5-porters/
47
48 =head1 How are Perl Releases Numbered?
49
50 Beginning with v5.6.0, even versions will stand for maintenance releases
51 and odd versions for development releases, i.e., v5.6.x for maintenance
52 releases, and v5.7.x for development releases.  Before v5.6.0, subversions
53 _01 through _49 were reserved for bug-fix maintenance releases, and
54 subversions _50 through _99 for unstable development versions.
55
56 For example, in v5.6.1, the revision number is 5, the version is 6,
57 and 1 is the subversion.
58
59 For compatibility with the older numbering scheme the composite floating
60 point version number continues to be available as the magic variable $],
61 and amounts to C<$revision + $version/1000 + $subversion/100000>.  This
62 can still be used in comparisons.
63
64         print "You've got an old perl\n" if $] < 5.005_03;
65
66 In addition, the version is also available as a string in $^V.
67
68         print "You've got a new perl\n" if $^V and $^V ge v5.6.0;
69
70 You can also require particular version (or later) with:
71
72         use 5.006;
73
74 or using the new syntax available only from v5.6 onward:
75
76         use v5.6.0;
77
78 At some point in the future, we may need to decide what to call the
79 next big revision.  In the .package file used by metaconfig to
80 generate Configure, there are two variables that might be relevant:
81 $baserev=5 and $package=perl5.
82
83 Perl releases produced by the members of perl5-porters are usually
84 available on CPAN in the F<src/5.0/maint> and F<src/5.0/devel>
85 directories.
86
87 =head2 Maintenance and Development Subversions
88
89 The first rule of maintenance work is "First, do no harm."
90
91 Trial releases of bug-fix maintenance releases are announced on
92 perl5-porters. Trial releases use the new subversion number (to avoid
93 testers installing it over the previous release) and include a 'local
94 patch' entry in F<patchlevel.h>. The distribution file contains the
95 string C<MAINT_TRIAL> to make clear that the file is not meant for
96 public consumption.
97
98 In general, the names of official distribution files for the public
99 always match the regular expression:
100
101     ^perl\d+\.(\d+)\.\d+(-MAINT_TRIAL_\d+)\.tar\.gz$
102
103 C<$1> in the pattern is always an even number for maintenance
104 versions, and odd for developer releases.
105
106 In the past it has been observed that pumpkings tend to invent new
107 naming conventions on the fly. If you are a pumpking, before you
108 invent a new name for any of the three types of perl distributions,
109 please inform the guys from the CPAN who are doing indexing and
110 provide the trees of symlinks and the like. They will have to know
111 I<in advance> what you decide.
112
113 =head2 Why is it called the patch pumpkin?
114
115 Chip Salzenberg gets credit for that, with a nod to his cow orker,
116 David Croy.  We had passed around various names (baton, token, hot
117 potato) but none caught on.  Then, Chip asked:
118
119 [begin quote]
120
121    Who has the patch pumpkin?
122
123 To explain:  David Croy once told me once that at a previous job,
124 there was one tape drive and multiple systems that used it for backups.
125 But instead of some high-tech exclusion software, they used a low-tech
126 method to prevent multiple simultaneous backups: a stuffed pumpkin.
127 No one was allowed to make backups unless they had the "backup pumpkin".
128
129 [end quote]
130
131 The name has stuck.
132
133 =head1 Philosophical Issues in Patching and Porting Perl
134
135 There are no absolute rules, but there are some general guidelines I
136 have tried to follow as I apply patches to the perl sources.
137 (This section is still under construction.)
138
139 =head2 Solve problems as generally as possible
140
141 Never implement a specific restricted solution to a problem when you
142 can solve the same problem in a more general, flexible way.
143
144 For example, for dynamic loading to work on some SVR4 systems, we had
145 to build a shared libperl.so library.  In order to build "FAT" binaries
146 on NeXT 4.0 systems, we had to build a special libperl library.  Rather
147 than continuing to build a contorted nest of special cases, I
148 generalized the process of building libperl so that NeXT and SVR4 users
149 could still get their work done, but others could build a shared
150 libperl if they wanted to as well.
151
152 Contain your changes carefully.  Assume nothing about other operating
153 systems, not even closely related ones.  Your changes must not affect
154 other platforms.
155
156 Spy shamelessly on how similar patching or porting issues have been
157 settled elsewhere.
158
159 If feasible, try to keep filenames 8.3-compliant to humor those poor
160 souls that get joy from running Perl under such dire limitations.
161 There's a script, F<check83.pl>, for keeping your nose 8.3-clean.
162 In a similar vein, do not create files or directories which differ only
163 in case (upper versus lower).
164
165 =head2 Seek consensus on major changes
166
167 If you are making big changes, don't do it in secret.  Discuss the
168 ideas in advance on perl5-porters.
169
170 =head2 Keep the documentation up-to-date
171
172 If your changes may affect how users use perl, then check to be sure
173 that the documentation is in sync with your changes.  Be sure to
174 check all the files F<pod/*.pod> and also the F<INSTALL> document.
175
176 Consider writing the appropriate documentation first and then
177 implementing your change to correspond to the documentation.
178
179 =head2 Avoid machine-specific #ifdef's
180
181 To the extent reasonable, try to avoid machine-specific #ifdef's in
182 the sources.  Instead, use feature-specific #ifdef's.  The reason is
183 that the machine-specific #ifdef's may not be valid across major
184 releases of the operating system.  Further, the feature-specific tests
185 may help out folks on another platform who have the same problem.
186
187 =head2 Machine-specific files
188
189 =over 4
190
191 =item source code
192
193 If you have many machine-specific #defines or #includes, consider
194 creating an "osish.h" (F<os2ish.h>, F<vmsish.h>, and so on) and including
195 that in F<perl.h>.  If you have several machine-specific files (function
196 emulations, function stubs, build utility wrappers) you may create a
197 separate subdirectory (djgpp, win32) and put the files in there.
198 Remember to update C<MANIFEST> when you add files.
199
200 If your system supports dynamic loading but none of the existing
201 methods at F<ext/DynaLoader/dl_*.xs> work for you, you must write
202 a new one.  Study the existing ones to see what kind of interface
203 you must supply.
204
205 =item build hints
206
207 There are two kinds of hints: hints for building Perl and hints for
208 extensions.   The former live in the C<hints> subdirectory, the latter
209 in C<ext/*/hints> subdirectories.
210
211 The top level hints are Bourne-shell scripts that set, modify and
212 unset appropriate Configure variables, based on the Configure command
213 line options and possibly existing config.sh and Policy.sh files from
214 previous Configure runs.
215
216 The extension hints are written in Perl (by the time they are used
217 miniperl has been built) and control the building of their respective
218 extensions.  They can be used to for example manipulate compilation
219 and linking flags.
220
221 =item build and installation Makefiles, scripts, and so forth
222
223 Sometimes you will also need to tweak the Perl build and installation
224 procedure itself, like for example F<Makefile.SH> and F<installperl>.
225 Tread very carefully, even more than usual.  Contain your changes
226 with utmost care.
227
228 =item test suite
229
230 Many of the tests in C<t> subdirectory assume machine-specific things
231 like existence of certain functions, something about filesystem
232 semantics, certain external utilities and their error messages.  Use
233 the C<$^O> and the C<Config> module (which contains the results of the
234 Configure run, in effect the C<config.sh> converted to Perl) to either
235 skip (preferably not) or customize (preferable) the tests for your
236 platform.
237
238 =item modules
239
240 Certain standard modules may need updating if your operating system
241 sports for example a native filesystem naming.  You may want to update
242 some or all of the modules File::Basename, File::Spec, File::Path, and
243 File::Copy to become aware of your native filesystem syntax and
244 peculiarities.
245
246 Remember to have a $VERSION in the modules.  You can use the
247 F<Porting/checkVERSION.pl> script for checking this.
248
249 =item documentation
250
251 If your operating system comes from outside UNIX you almost certainly
252 will have differences in the available operating system functionality
253 (missing system calls, different semantics, whatever).  Please
254 document these at F<pod/perlport.pod>.  If your operating system is
255 the first B<not> to have a system call also update the list of
256 "portability-bewares" at the beginning of F<pod/perlfunc.pod>.
257
258 A file called F<README.youros> at the top level that explains things
259 like how to install perl at this platform, where to get any possibly
260 required additional software, and for example what test suite errors
261 to expect, is nice too.  Such files are in the process of being written
262 in pod format and will eventually be renamed F<INSTALL.youros>.
263
264 You may also want to write a separate F<.pod> file for your operating
265 system to tell about existing mailing lists, os-specific modules,
266 documentation, whatever.  Please name these along the lines of
267 F<perl>I<youros>.pod.  [unfinished: where to put this file (the pod/
268 subdirectory, of course: but more importantly, which/what index files
269 should be updated?)]
270
271 =back
272
273 =head2 Allow for lots of testing
274
275 We should never release a main version without testing it as a
276 subversion first.
277
278 =head2 Test popular applications and modules.
279
280 We should never release a main version without testing whether or not
281 it breaks various popular modules and applications.  A partial list of
282 such things would include majordomo, metaconfig, apache, Tk, CGI,
283 libnet, and libwww, to name just a few.  Of course it's quite possible
284 that some of those things will be just plain broken and need to be fixed,
285 but, in general, we ought to try to avoid breaking widely-installed
286 things.
287
288 =head2 Automated generation of derivative files
289
290 The F<embed.h>, F<keywords.h>, F<opcode.h>, F<regcharclass.h>,
291 F<l1_char_class_tab.h>, and F<perltoc.pod> files
292 are all automatically generated by perl scripts.  In general, don't
293 patch these directly; patch the data files instead.
294
295 F<Configure> and F<config_h.SH> are also automatically generated by
296 B<metaconfig>.  In general, you should patch the metaconfig units
297 instead of patching these files directly.  However, very minor changes
298 to F<Configure> may be made in between major sync-ups with the
299 metaconfig units, which tends to be complicated operations.  But be
300 careful, this can quickly spiral out of control.  Running metaconfig
301 is not really hard.
302
303 Also F<Makefile> is automatically produced from F<Makefile.SH>.
304 In general, look out for all F<*.SH> files.
305
306 Finally, the sample files in the F<Porting/> subdirectory are
307 generated automatically by the script F<U/mksample> included 
308 with the metaconfig units.  See L<"run metaconfig"> below for
309 information on obtaining the metaconfig units.
310
311 =head1 How to Make a Distribution
312
313 This section has now been expanded and moved into its own file,
314 F<Porting/release_managers_guide.pod>.
315
316 I've kept some of the subsections here for now, as they don't directly
317 relate to building a release any more, but still contain what might be
318 useful information - DAPM 7/2009.
319
320 =head2 run metaconfig
321
322 If you need to make changes to Configure or config_h.SH, it may be best to
323 change the appropriate metaconfig units instead, and regenerate Configure.
324
325         metaconfig -m
326
327 will regenerate F<Configure> and F<config_h.SH>.  Much more information
328 on obtaining and running metaconfig is in the F<U/README> file
329 that comes with Perl's metaconfig units.
330
331 Since metaconfig is hard to change, running correction scripts after
332 this generation is sometimes needed. Configure gained complexity over
333 time, and the order in which config_h.SH is generated can cause havoc
334 when compiling perl. Therefor, you need to run Porting/config_h.pl
335 after that generation. All that and more is described in the README
336 files that come with the metaunits.
337
338 Perl's metaconfig units should be available on CPAN.  A set of units
339 that will work with perl5.9.x is in a file with a name similar to
340 F<mc_units-20070423.tgz> under L<http://www.cpan.org/authors/id/H/HM/HMBRAND/>.
341 The mc_units tar file should be unpacked in your main perl source directory.
342 Note: those units were for use with 5.9.x.  There may have been changes since
343 then.  Check for later versions or contact perl5-porters@perl.org to obtain a
344 pointer to the current version.
345
346 Alternatively, do consider if the F<*ish.h> files or the hint files might be
347 a better place for your changes.
348
349 =head2 MANIFEST
350
351 If you are using metaconfig to regenerate Configure, then you should note
352 that metaconfig actually uses MANIFEST.new, so you want to be sure
353 MANIFEST.new is up-to-date too.  I haven't found the MANIFEST/MANIFEST.new
354 distinction particularly useful, but that's probably because I still haven't
355 learned how to use the full suite of tools in the dist distribution.
356
357
358 =head2 Run Configure
359
360 This will build a config.sh and config.h.  You can skip this if you haven't
361 changed Configure or config_h.SH at all.  I use the following command
362
363     sh Configure -Dprefix=/opt/perl -Doptimize=-O -Dusethreads \
364         -Dcf_by='yourname' \
365         -Dcf_email='yourname@yourhost.yourplace.com' \
366         -Dperladmin='yourname@yourhost.yourplace.com' \
367         -Dmydomain='.yourplace.com' \
368         -Dmyhostname='yourhost' \
369         -des
370
371 =head2 Update Porting/config.sh and Porting/config_H
372
373 [XXX 
374 This section needs revision.  We're currently working on easing
375 the task of keeping the vms, win32, and plan9 config.sh info
376 up-to-date.  The plan is to use keep up-to-date 'canned' config.sh
377 files in the appropriate subdirectories and then generate 'canned'
378 config.h files for vms, win32, etc. from the generic config.sh file.
379 This is to ease maintenance.  When Configure gets updated, the parts
380 sometimes get scrambled around, and the changes in config_H can
381 sometimes be very hard to follow.  config.sh, on the other hand, can
382 safely be sorted, so it's easy to track (typically very small) changes
383 to config.sh and then propagate them to a canned 'config.h' by any
384 number of means, including a perl script in win32/ or carrying 
385 F<config.sh> and F<config_h.SH> to a Unix system and running sh
386 config_h.SH.)  Vms uses F<configure.com> to generate its own F<config.sh>
387 and F<config.h>.  If you want to add a new variable to F<config.sh> check
388 with vms folk how to add it to configure.com too.
389 XXX]
390
391 The F<Porting/config.sh> and F<Porting/config_H> files are provided to
392 help those folks who can't run Configure.  It is important to keep
393 them up-to-date.  If you have changed F<config_h.SH>, those changes must
394 be reflected in config_H as well.  (The name config_H was chosen to
395 distinguish the file from config.h even on case-insensitive file systems.)
396 Simply edit the existing config_H file; keep the first few explanatory
397 lines and then copy your new config.h below.
398
399 It may also be necessary to update win32/config.?c, and
400 F<plan9/config.plan9>, though you should be quite careful in doing so if
401 you are not familiar with those systems.  You might want to issue your
402 patch with a promise to quickly issue a follow-up that handles those
403 directories.
404
405 =head2 make regen_perly
406
407 If F<perly.y> has been edited, it is necessary to run this target to rebuild
408 F<perly.h>, F<perly.act> and F<perly.tab>. In fact this target just runs the Perl
409 script F<regen_perly.pl>. Note that F<perly.c> is I<not> rebuilt; this is just a
410 plain static file now. 
411
412 This target relies on you having Bison installed on your system. Running
413 the target will tell you if you haven't got the right version, and if so,
414 where to get the right one. Or if you prefer, you could hack
415 F<regen_perly.pl> to work with your version of Bison. The important things
416 are that the regexes can still extract out the right chunks of the Bison
417 output into F<perly.act> and F<perly.tab>, and that the contents of those two
418 files, plus F<perly.h>, are functionally equivalent to those produced by the
419 supported version of Bison.
420
421 Note that in the old days, you had to do C<make run_byacc> instead.
422
423 =head2 make regen_all
424
425 This target takes care of the regen_headers target.
426 (It used to also call the regen_pods target, but that has been eliminated.)
427
428 =head2 make regen_headers
429
430 The F<embed.h>, F<keywords.h>, and F<opcode.h> files are all automatically
431 generated by perl scripts.  Since the user isn't guaranteed to have a
432 working perl, we can't require the user to generate them.  Hence you have
433 to, if you're making a distribution.
434
435 I used to include rules like the following in the makefile:
436
437     # The following three header files are generated automatically
438     # The correct versions should be already supplied with the perl kit,
439     # in case you don't have perl or 'sh' available.
440     # The - is to ignore error return codes in case you have the source
441     # installed read-only or you don't have perl yet.
442     keywords.h: keywords.pl
443             @echo "Don't worry if this fails."
444             - perl keywords.pl
445
446
447 However, I got B<lots> of mail consisting of people worrying because the
448 command failed.  I eventually decided that I would save myself time
449 and effort by manually running C<make regen_headers> myself rather
450 than answering all the questions and complaints about the failing
451 command.
452
453 =head2 globvar.sym, and perlio.sym
454
455 Make sure these files are up-to-date.  Read the comments in these
456 files and in F<perl_exp.SH> to see what to do.
457
458 =head2 Binary compatibility
459
460 If you do change F<embed.fnc> think carefully about
461 what you are doing.  To the extent reasonable, we'd like to maintain
462 source and binary compatibility with older releases of perl.  That way,
463 extensions built under one version of perl will continue to work with
464 new versions of perl.
465
466 Of course, some incompatible changes may well be necessary.  I'm just
467 suggesting that we not make any such changes without thinking carefully
468 about them first.  If possible, we should provide
469 backwards-compatibility stubs.  There's a lot of XS code out there.
470 Let's not force people to keep changing it.
471
472 =head2 PPPort
473
474 F<cpan/Devel-PPPort/PPPort.pm> needs to be synchronized to include all
475 new macros added to .h files (normally F<perl.h> and F<XSUB.h>, but others
476 as well). Since chances are that when a new macro is added the
477 committer will forget to update F<PPPort.pm>, it's the best to diff for
478 changes in .h files when making a new release and making sure that
479 F<PPPort.pm> contains them all.
480
481 The pumpking can delegate the synchronization responsibility to anybody
482 else, but the release process is the only place where we can make sure
483 that no new macros fell through the cracks.
484
485
486 =head2 Todo
487
488 The F<Porting/todo.pod> file contains a roughly-categorized unordered
489 list of aspects of Perl that could use enhancement, features that could
490 be added, areas that could be cleaned up, and so on.  During your term
491 as pumpkin-holder, you will probably address some of these issues, and
492 perhaps identify others which, while you decide not to address them this
493 time around, may be tackled in the future.  Update the file to reflect
494 the situation as it stands when you hand over the pumpkin.
495
496 You might like, early in your pumpkin-holding career, to see if you
497 can find champions for particular issues on the to-do list: an issue
498 owned is an issue more likely to be resolved.
499
500 There are also some more porting-specific L</Todo> items later in this
501 file.
502
503 =head2 OS/2-specific updates
504
505 In the os2 directory is F<diff.configure>, a set of OS/2-specific
506 diffs against B<Configure>.  If you make changes to Configure, you may
507 want to consider regenerating this diff file to save trouble for the
508 OS/2 maintainer.
509
510 You can also consider the OS/2 diffs as reminders of portability
511 things that need to be fixed in Configure.
512
513 =head2 VMS-specific updates
514
515 The Perl revision number appears as "perl5" in F<configure.com>.
516 It is courteous to update that if necessary.
517
518
519 =head2 Making a new patch
520
521 I find the F<makepatch> utility quite handy for making patches.
522 You can obtain it from any CPAN archive under
523 L<http://www.cpan.org/authors/Johan_Vromans/>.  There are a couple
524 of differences between my version and the standard one. I have mine do
525 a
526
527         # Print a reassuring "End of Patch" note so people won't
528         # wonder if their mailer truncated patches.
529         print "\n\nEnd of Patch.\n";
530
531 at the end.  That's because I used to get questions from people asking
532 if their mail was truncated.
533
534 It also writes Index: lines which include the new directory prefix
535 (change Index: print, approx line 294 or 310 depending on the version,
536 to read:  print PATCH ("Index: $newdir$new\n");).  That helps patches
537 work with more POSIX conformant patch programs.
538
539 Here's how I generate a new patch.  I'll use the hypothetical
540 5.004_07 to 5.004_08 patch as an example.
541
542         # unpack perl5.004_07/
543         gzip -d -c perl5.004_07.tar.gz | tar -xof -
544         # unpack perl5.004_08/
545         gzip -d -c perl5.004_08.tar.gz | tar -xof -
546         makepatch perl5.004_07 perl5.004_08 > perl5.004_08.pat
547
548 Makepatch will automatically generate appropriate B<rm> commands to remove
549 deleted files.  Unfortunately, it will not correctly set permissions
550 for newly created files, so you may have to do so manually.  For example,
551 patch 5.003_04 created a new test F<t/op/gv.t> which needs to be executable,
552 so at the top of the patch, I inserted the following lines:
553
554         # Make a new test
555         touch t/op/gv.t
556         chmod +x t/opt/gv.t
557
558 Now, of course, my patch is now wrong because makepatch didn't know I
559 was going to do that command, and it patched against /dev/null.
560
561 So, what I do is sort out all such shell commands that need to be in the
562 patch (including possible mv-ing of files, if needed) and put that in the
563 shell commands at the top of the patch.  Next, I delete all the patch parts
564 of perl5.004_08.pat, leaving just the shell commands.  Then, I do the
565 following:
566
567         cd perl5.004_07
568         sh ../perl5.004_08.pat
569         cd ..
570         makepatch perl5.004_07 perl5.004_08 >> perl5.004_08.pat
571
572 (Note the append to preserve my shell commands.)
573 Now, my patch will line up with what the end users are going to do.
574
575 =head2 Testing your patch
576
577 It seems obvious, but be sure to test your patch.  That is, verify that
578 it produces exactly the same thing as your full distribution.
579
580         rm -rf perl5.004_07
581         gzip -d -c perl5.004_07.tar.gz | tar -xf -
582         cd perl5.004_07
583         sh ../perl5.004_08.pat
584         patch -p1 -N < ../perl5.004_08.pat
585         cd ..
586         gdiff -r perl5.004_07 perl5.004_08
587
588 where B<gdiff> is GNU diff.  Other diff's may also do recursive checking.
589
590 =head2 More testing
591
592 Again, it's obvious, but you should test your new version as widely as you
593 can.  You can be sure you'll hear about it quickly if your version doesn't
594 work on both ANSI and pre-ANSI compilers, and on common systems such as
595 SunOS 4.1.[34], Solaris, and Linux.
596
597 If your changes include conditional code, try to test the different
598 branches as thoroughly as you can.  For example, if your system
599 supports dynamic loading, you can also test static loading with
600
601         sh Configure -Uusedl
602
603 You can also hand-tweak your config.h to try out different #ifdef
604 branches.
605
606 =head2 Other tests
607
608 =over 4
609
610 =item gcc -ansi -pedantic
611
612 Configure -Dgccansipedantic [ -Dcc=gcc ] will enable (via the cflags script,
613 not $Config{ccflags}) the gcc strict ANSI C flags -ansi and -pedantic for
614 the compilation of the core files on platforms where it knows it can
615 do so (like Linux, see cflags.SH for the full list), and on some
616 platforms only one (Solaris can do only -pedantic, not -ansi).
617 The flag -DPERL_GCC_PEDANTIC also gets added, since gcc does not add
618 any internal cpp flag to signify that -pedantic is being used, as it
619 does for -ansi (__STRICT_ANSI__).
620
621 Note that the -ansi and -pedantic are enabled only for version 3 (and
622 later) of gcc, since even gcc version 2.95.4 finds lots of seemingly
623 false "value computed not used" errors from Perl.
624
625 The -ansi and -pedantic are useful in catching at least the following
626 nonportable practices:
627
628 =over 4
629
630 =item *
631
632 gcc-specific extensions
633
634 =item *
635
636 lvalue casts
637
638 =item *
639
640 // C++ comments
641
642 =item *
643
644 enum trailing commas
645
646 =back
647
648 The -Dgccansipedantic should be used only when cleaning up the code,
649 not for production builds, since otherwise gcc cannot inline certain
650 things.
651
652 =back
653
654 =head1 Common Gotchas
655
656 =over 4
657
658 =item Probably Prefer POSIX
659
660 It's often the case that you'll need to choose whether to do
661 something the BSD-ish way or the POSIX-ish way.  It's usually not
662 a big problem when the two systems use different names for similar
663 functions, such as memcmp() and bcmp().  The perl.h header file
664 handles these by appropriate #defines, selecting the POSIX mem*()
665 functions if available, but falling back on the b*() functions, if
666 need be.
667
668 More serious is the case where some brilliant person decided to
669 use the same function name but give it a different meaning or
670 calling sequence :-).  getpgrp() and setpgrp() come to mind.
671 These are a real problem on systems that aim for conformance to
672 one standard (e.g. POSIX), but still try to support the other way
673 of doing things (e.g. BSD).  My general advice (still not really
674 implemented in the source) is to do something like the following.
675 Suppose there are two alternative versions, fooPOSIX() and
676 fooBSD().
677
678     #ifdef HAS_FOOPOSIX
679         /* use fooPOSIX(); */
680     #else
681     #  ifdef HAS_FOOBSD
682         /* try to emulate fooPOSIX() with fooBSD();
683            perhaps with the following:  */
684     #    define fooPOSIX fooBSD
685     #  else
686     #  /* Uh, oh.  We have to supply our own. */
687     #    define fooPOSIX Perl_fooPOSIX
688     #  endif
689     #endif
690
691 =item Think positively
692
693 If you need to add an #ifdef test, it is usually easier to follow if you
694 think positively, e.g.
695
696         #ifdef HAS_NEATO_FEATURE
697             /* use neato feature */
698         #else
699             /* use some fallback mechanism */
700         #endif
701
702 rather than the more impenetrable
703
704         #ifndef MISSING_NEATO_FEATURE
705             /* Not missing it, so we must have it, so use it */
706         #else
707             /* Are missing it, so fall back on something else. */
708         #endif
709
710 Of course for this toy example, there's not much difference.  But when
711 the #ifdef's start spanning a couple of screen fulls, and the #else's
712 are marked something like
713
714         #else /* !MISSING_NEATO_FEATURE */
715
716 I find it easy to get lost.
717
718 =item Providing Missing Functions -- Problem
719
720 Not all systems have all the neat functions you might want or need, so
721 you might decide to be helpful and provide an emulation.  This is
722 sound in theory and very kind of you, but please be careful about what
723 you name the function.  Let me use the C<pause()> function as an
724 illustration.
725
726 Perl5.003 has the following in F<perl.h>
727
728     #ifndef HAS_PAUSE
729     #define pause() sleep((32767<<16)+32767)
730     #endif
731
732 Configure sets HAS_PAUSE if the system has the pause() function, so
733 this #define only kicks in if the pause() function is missing.
734 Nice idea, right?
735
736 Unfortunately, some systems apparently have a prototype for pause()
737 in F<unistd.h>, but don't actually have the function in the library.
738 (Or maybe they do have it in a library we're not using.)
739
740 Thus, the compiler sees something like
741
742     extern int pause(void);
743     /* . . . */
744     #define pause() sleep((32767<<16)+32767)
745
746 and dies with an error message.  (Some compilers don't mind this;
747 others apparently do.)
748
749 To work around this, 5.003_03 and later have the following in perl.h:
750
751     /* Some unistd.h's give a prototype for pause() even though
752        HAS_PAUSE ends up undefined.  This causes the #define
753        below to be rejected by the compiler.  Sigh.
754     */
755     #ifdef HAS_PAUSE
756     #  define Pause     pause
757     #else
758     #  define Pause() sleep((32767<<16)+32767)
759     #endif
760
761 This works.
762
763 The curious reader may wonder why I didn't do the following in
764 F<util.c> instead:
765
766     #ifndef HAS_PAUSE
767     void pause()
768     {
769     sleep((32767<<16)+32767);
770     }
771     #endif
772
773 That is, since the function is missing, just provide it.
774 Then things would probably be been alright, it would seem.
775
776 Well, almost.  It could be made to work.  The problem arises from the
777 conflicting needs of dynamic loading and namespace protection.
778
779 For dynamic loading to work on AIX (and VMS) we need to provide a list
780 of symbols to be exported.  This is done by the script F<perl_exp.SH>,
781 which reads F<embed.fnc>.  Thus, the C<pause>
782 symbol would have to be added to F<embed.fnc>  So far, so good.
783
784 On the other hand, one of the goals of Perl5 is to make it easy to
785 either extend or embed perl and link it with other libraries.  This
786 means we have to be careful to keep the visible namespace "clean".
787 That is, we don't want perl's global variables to conflict with
788 those in the other application library.  Although this work is still
789 in progress, the way it is currently done is via the F<embed.h> file.
790 This file is built from the F<embed.fnc> file,
791 since those files already list the globally visible symbols.  If we
792 had added C<pause> to F<embed.fnc>, then F<embed.h> would contain the
793 line
794
795     #define pause       Perl_pause
796
797 and calls to C<pause> in the perl sources would now point to
798 C<Perl_pause>.  Now, when B<ld> is run to build the F<perl> executable,
799 it will go looking for C<perl_pause>, which probably won't exist in any
800 of the standard libraries.  Thus the build of perl will fail.
801
802 Those systems where C<HAS_PAUSE> is not defined would be ok, however,
803 since they would get a C<Perl_pause> function in util.c.  The rest of
804 the world would be in trouble.
805
806 And yes, this scenario has happened.  On SCO, the function C<chsize>
807 is available.  (I think it's in F<-lx>, the Xenix compatibility
808 library.)  Since the perl4 days (and possibly before), Perl has
809 included a C<chsize> function that gets called something akin to
810
811     #ifndef HAS_CHSIZE
812     I32 chsize(fd, length)
813     /*  . . . */
814     #endif
815
816 When 5.003 added
817
818     #define chsize      Perl_chsize
819
820 to F<embed.h>, the compile started failing on SCO systems.
821
822 The "fix" is to give the function a different name.  The one
823 implemented in 5.003_05 isn't optimal, but here's what was done:
824
825     #ifdef HAS_CHSIZE
826     # ifdef my_chsize      /* Probably #defined to Perl_my_chsize */
827     #   undef my_chsize    /* in embed.h */
828     # endif
829     # define my_chsize chsize
830     #endif
831
832 My explanatory comment in patch 5.003_05 said:
833
834     Undef and then re-define my_chsize from Perl_my_chsize to
835     just plain chsize if this system HAS_CHSIZE.  This probably only
836     applies to SCO.  This shows the perils of having internal
837     functions with the same name as external library functions :-).
838
839 Now, we can safely put C<my_chsize> in C<embed.fnc>, export it, and
840 hide it with F<embed.h>.
841
842 To be consistent with what I did for C<pause>, I probably should have
843 called the new function C<Chsize>, rather than C<my_chsize>.
844 However, the perl sources are quite inconsistent on this (Consider
845 New, Mymalloc, and Myremalloc, to name just a few.)
846
847 There is a problem with this fix, however, in that C<Perl_chsize>
848 was available as a F<libperl.a> library function in 5.003, but it
849 isn't available any more (as of 5.003_07).  This means that we've
850 broken binary compatibility.  This is not good.
851
852 =item Providing missing functions -- some ideas
853
854 We currently don't have a standard way of handling such missing
855 function names.  Right now, I'm effectively thinking aloud about a
856 solution.  Some day, I'll try to formally propose a solution.
857
858 Part of the problem is that we want to have some functions listed as
859 exported but not have their names mangled by embed.h or possibly
860 conflict with names in standard system headers.  We actually already
861 have such a list at the end of F<perl_exp.SH> (though that list is
862 out-of-date):
863
864     # extra globals not included above.
865     cat <<END >> perl.exp
866     perl_init_ext
867     perl_init_fold
868     perl_init_i18nl14n
869     perl_alloc
870     perl_construct
871     perl_destruct
872     perl_free
873     perl_parse
874     perl_run
875     perl_get_sv
876     perl_get_av
877     perl_get_hv
878     perl_get_cv
879     perl_call_argv
880     perl_call_pv
881     perl_call_method
882     perl_call_sv
883     perl_requirepv
884     safecalloc
885     safemalloc
886     saferealloc
887     safefree
888
889 This still needs much thought, but I'm inclined to think that one
890 possible solution is to prefix all such functions with C<perl_> in the
891 source and list them along with the other C<perl_*> functions in
892 F<perl_exp.SH>.
893
894 Thus, for C<chsize>, we'd do something like the following:
895
896     /* in perl.h */
897     #ifdef HAS_CHSIZE
898     #  define perl_chsize chsize
899     #endif
900
901 then in some file (e.g. F<util.c> or F<doio.c>) do
902
903     #ifndef HAS_CHSIZE
904     I32 perl_chsize(fd, length)
905     /* implement the function here . . . */
906     #endif
907
908 Alternatively, we could just always use C<chsize> everywhere and move
909 C<chsize> from F<embed.fnc> to the end of F<perl_exp.SH>.  That would
910 probably be fine as long as our C<chsize> function agreed with all the
911 C<chsize> function prototypes in the various systems we'll be using.
912 As long as the prototypes in actual use don't vary that much, this is
913 probably a good alternative.  (As a counter-example, note how Configure
914 and perl have to go through hoops to find and use get Malloc_t and
915 Free_t for C<malloc> and C<free>.)
916
917 At the moment, this latter option is what I tend to prefer.
918
919 =item All the world's a VAX
920
921 Sorry, showing my age:-).  Still, all the world is not BSD 4.[34],
922 SVR4, or POSIX.  Be aware that SVR3-derived systems are still quite
923 common (do you have any idea how many systems run SCO?)  If you don't
924 have a bunch of v7 manuals handy, the metaconfig units (by default
925 installed in F</usr/local/lib/dist/U>) are a good resource to look at
926 for portability.
927
928 =back
929
930 =head1 Miscellaneous Topics
931
932 =head2 Autoconf
933
934 Why does perl use a metaconfig-generated Configure script instead of an
935 autoconf-generated configure script?
936
937 Metaconfig and autoconf are two tools with very similar purposes.
938 Metaconfig is actually the older of the two, and was originally written
939 by Larry Wall, while autoconf is probably now used in a wider variety of
940 packages.  The autoconf info file discusses the history of autoconf and
941 how it came to be.  The curious reader is referred there for further
942 information.
943
944 Overall, both tools are quite good, I think, and the choice of which one
945 to use could be argued either way.  In March, 1994, when I was just
946 starting to work on Configure support for Perl5, I considered both
947 autoconf and metaconfig, and eventually decided to use metaconfig for the
948 following reasons:
949
950 =over 4
951
952 =item Compatibility with Perl4
953
954 Perl4 used metaconfig, so many of the #ifdef's were already set up for
955 metaconfig.  Of course metaconfig had evolved some since Perl4's days,
956 but not so much that it posed any serious problems.
957
958 =item Metaconfig worked for me
959
960 My system at the time was Interactive 2.2, an SVR3.2/386 derivative that
961 also had some POSIX support.  Metaconfig-generated Configure scripts
962 worked fine for me on that system.  On the other hand, autoconf-generated
963 scripts usually didn't.  (They did come quite close, though, in some
964 cases.)  At the time, I actually fetched a large number of GNU packages
965 and checked.  Not a single one configured and compiled correctly
966 out-of-the-box with the system's cc compiler.
967
968 =item Configure can be interactive
969
970 With both autoconf and metaconfig, if the script works, everything is
971 fine.  However, one of my main problems with autoconf-generated scripts
972 was that if it guessed wrong about something, it could be B<very> hard to
973 go back and fix it.  For example, autoconf always insisted on passing the
974 -Xp flag to cc (to turn on POSIX behavior), even when that wasn't what I
975 wanted or needed for that package.  There was no way short of editing the
976 configure script to turn this off.  You couldn't just edit the resulting
977 Makefile at the end because the -Xp flag influenced a number of other
978 configure tests.
979
980 Metaconfig's Configure scripts, on the other hand, can be interactive.
981 Thus if Configure is guessing things incorrectly, you can go back and fix
982 them.  This isn't as important now as it was when we were actively
983 developing Configure support for new features such as dynamic loading,
984 but it's still useful occasionally.
985
986 =item GPL
987
988 At the time, autoconf-generated scripts were covered under the GNU Public
989 License, and hence weren't suitable for inclusion with Perl, which has a
990 different licensing policy.  (Autoconf's licensing has since changed.)
991
992 =item Modularity
993
994 Metaconfig builds up Configure from a collection of discrete pieces
995 called "units".  You can override the standard behavior by supplying your
996 own unit.  With autoconf, you have to patch the standard files instead.
997 I find the metaconfig "unit" method easier to work with.  Others
998 may find metaconfig's units clumsy to work with.
999
1000 =back
1001
1002 =head2 Why isn't there a directory to override Perl's library?
1003
1004 Mainly because no one's gotten around to making one.  Note that
1005 "making one"  involves changing perl.c, Configure, config_h.SH (and
1006 associated files, see above), and I<documenting> it all in the
1007 INSTALL file.
1008
1009 Apparently, most folks who want to override one of the standard library
1010 files simply do it by overwriting the standard library files.
1011
1012 =head2 APPLLIB
1013
1014 In the perl.c sources, you'll find an undocumented APPLLIB_EXP
1015 variable, sort of like PRIVLIB_EXP and ARCHLIB_EXP (which are
1016 documented in config_h.SH).  Here's what APPLLIB_EXP is for, from
1017 a mail message from Larry:
1018
1019     The main intent of APPLLIB_EXP is for folks who want to send out a
1020     version of Perl embedded in their product.  They would set the
1021     symbol to be the name of the library containing the files needed
1022     to run or to support their particular application.  This works at
1023     the "override" level to make sure they get their own versions of
1024     any library code that they absolutely must have configuration
1025     control over.
1026
1027     As such, I don't see any conflict with a sysadmin using it for a
1028     override-ish sort of thing, when installing a generic Perl.  It
1029     should probably have been named something to do with overriding
1030     though.  Since it's undocumented we could still change it...  :-)
1031
1032 Given that it's already there, you can use it to override distribution modules.
1033 One way to do that is to add
1034
1035         ccflags="$ccflags -DAPPLLIB_EXP=\"/my/override\""
1036
1037 to your config.over file.  (You have to be particularly careful to get the
1038 double quotes in.  APPLLIB_EXP must be a valid C string.  It might
1039 actually be easier to just #define it yourself in perl.c.)
1040
1041 Then perl.c will put /my/override ahead of ARCHLIB and PRIVLIB.  Perl will
1042 also search architecture-specific and version-specific subdirectories of
1043 APPLLIB_EXP.
1044
1045 =head2 Shared libperl.so location
1046
1047 Why isn't the shared libperl.so installed in /usr/lib/ along
1048 with "all the other" shared libraries?  Instead, it is installed
1049 in $archlib, which is typically something like
1050
1051         /usr/local/lib/perl5/archname/5.00404
1052
1053 and is architecture- and version-specific.
1054
1055 The basic reason why a shared libperl.so gets put in $archlib is so that
1056 you can have more than one version of perl on the system at the same time,
1057 and have each refer to its own libperl.so.
1058
1059 Three examples might help.  All of these work now; none would work if you
1060 put libperl.so in /usr/lib.
1061
1062 =over
1063
1064 =item 1.
1065
1066 Suppose you want to have both threaded and non-threaded perl versions
1067 around.  Configure will name both perl libraries "libperl.so" (so that
1068 you can link to them with -lperl).  The perl binaries tell them apart
1069 by having looking in the appropriate $archlib directories.
1070
1071 =item 2.
1072
1073 Suppose you have perl5.004_04 installed and you want to try to compile
1074 it again, perhaps with different options or after applying a patch.
1075 If you already have libperl.so installed in /usr/lib/, then it may be
1076 either difficult or impossible to get ld.so to find the new libperl.so
1077 that you're trying to build.  If, instead, libperl.so is tucked away in
1078 $archlib, then you can always just change $archlib in the current perl
1079 you're trying to build so that ld.so won't find your old libperl.so.
1080 (The INSTALL file suggests you do this when building a debugging perl.)
1081
1082 =item 3.
1083
1084 The shared perl library is not a "well-behaved" shared library with
1085 proper major and minor version numbers, so you can't necessarily
1086 have perl5.004_04 and perl5.004_05 installed simultaneously.  Suppose
1087 perl5.004_04 were to install /usr/lib/libperl.so.4.4, and perl5.004_05
1088 were to install /usr/lib/libperl.so.4.5.  Now, when you try to run
1089 perl5.004_04, ld.so might try to load libperl.so.4.5, since it has
1090 the right "major version" number.  If this works at all, it almost
1091 certainly defeats the reason for keeping perl5.004_04 around.  Worse,
1092 with development subversions, you certainly can't guarantee that
1093 libperl.so.4.4 and libperl.so.4.55 will be compatible.
1094
1095 Anyway, all this leads to quite obscure failures that are sure to drive
1096 casual users crazy.  Even experienced users will get confused :-).  Upon
1097 reflection, I'd say leave libperl.so in $archlib.
1098
1099 =back
1100
1101 =head2 Indentation style
1102
1103 Over the years Perl has become a mishmash of
1104 various indentation styles, but the original "Larry style" can
1105 probably be restored with (GNU) indent somewhat like this:
1106
1107     indent -kr -nce -psl -sc
1108
1109 A more ambitious solution would also specify a list of Perl specific
1110 types with -TSV -TAV -THV .. -TMAGIC -TPerlIO ... but that list would
1111 be quite ungainly.  Also note that GNU indent also doesn't do aligning
1112 of consecutive assignments, which would truly wreck the layout in
1113 places like sv.c:Perl_sv_upgrade() or sv.c:Perl_clone_using().
1114 Similarly nicely aligned &&s, ||s and ==s would not be respected.
1115
1116 =head1 Upload Your Work to CPAN
1117
1118 You can upload your work to CPAN if you have a CPAN id.  Check out
1119 L<http://www.cpan.org/modules/04pause.html> for information on
1120 _PAUSE_, the Perl Author's Upload Server.
1121
1122 I typically upload both the patch file, e.g. F<perl5.004_08.pat.gz>
1123 and the full tar file, e.g. F<perl5.004_08.tar.gz>.
1124
1125 If you want your patch to appear in the F<src/5.0/unsupported>
1126 directory on CPAN, send e-mail to the CPAN master librarian.  (Check
1127 out L<http://www.cpan.org/CPAN.html> ).
1128
1129 =head1 Help Save the World
1130
1131 You should definitely announce your patch on the perl5-porters list.
1132
1133 =head1 Todo
1134
1135 Here, in no particular order, are some Configure and build-related
1136 items that merit consideration.  This list isn't exhaustive, it's just
1137 what I came up with off the top of my head.
1138
1139 =head2 Adding missing library functions to Perl
1140
1141 The perl Configure script automatically determines which headers and
1142 functions you have available on your system and arranges for them to be
1143 included in the compilation and linking process.  Occasionally, when porting
1144 perl to an operating system for the first time, you may find that the
1145 operating system is missing a key function.  While perl may still build
1146 without this function, no perl program will be able to reference the missing
1147 function.  You may be able to write the missing function yourself, or you
1148 may be able to find the missing function in the distribution files for
1149 another software package.  In this case, you need to instruct the perl
1150 configure-and-build process to use your function.  Perform these steps.
1151
1152 =over 3
1153
1154 =item *
1155
1156 Code and test the function you wish to add.  Test it carefully; you will
1157 have a much easier time debugging your code independently than when it is a
1158 part of perl.
1159
1160 =item *
1161
1162 Here is an implementation of the POSIX truncate function for an operating
1163 system (VOS) that does not supply one, but which does supply the ftruncate()
1164 function.
1165
1166   /* Beginning of modification history */
1167   /* Written 02-01-02 by Nick Ing-Simmons (nick@ing-simmons.net) */
1168   /* End of modification history */
1169
1170   /* VOS doesn't supply a truncate function, so we build one up
1171      from the available POSIX functions.  */
1172
1173   #include <fcntl.h>
1174   #include <sys/types.h>
1175   #include <unistd.h>
1176
1177   int
1178   truncate(const char *path, off_t len)
1179   {
1180    int fd = open(path,O_WRONLY);
1181    int code = -1;
1182    if (fd >= 0) {
1183      code = ftruncate(fd,len);
1184      close(fd);
1185    }
1186    return code;
1187   }
1188
1189 Place this file into a subdirectory that has the same name as the operating
1190 system. This file is named perl/vos/vos.c
1191
1192 =item *
1193
1194 If your operating system has a hints file (in perl/hints/XXX.sh for an
1195 operating system named XXX), then start with it.  If your operating system
1196 has no hints file, then create one.  You can use a hints file for a similar
1197 operating system, if one exists, as a template.
1198
1199 =item *
1200
1201 Add lines like the following to your hints file. The first line
1202 (d_truncate="define") instructs Configure that the truncate() function
1203 exists. The second line (archobjs="vos.o") instructs the makefiles that the
1204 perl executable depends on the existence of a file named "vos.o".  (Make
1205 will automatically look for "vos.c" and compile it with the same options as
1206 the perl source code).  The final line ("test -h...") adds a symbolic link
1207 to the top-level directory so that make can find vos.c.  Of course, you
1208 should use your own operating system name for the source file of extensions,
1209 not "vos.c".
1210
1211   # VOS does not have truncate() but we supply one in vos.c
1212   d_truncate="define"
1213   archobjs="vos.o"
1214
1215   # Help gmake find vos.c
1216   test -h vos.c || ln -s vos/vos.c vos.c
1217
1218 The hints file is a series of shell commands that are run in the top-level
1219 directory (the "perl" directory).  Thus, these commands are simply executed
1220 by Configure at an appropriate place during its execution.
1221
1222 =item *
1223
1224 At this point, you can run the Configure script and rebuild perl.  Carefully
1225 test the newly-built perl to ensure that normal paths, and error paths,
1226 behave as you expect.
1227
1228 =back
1229
1230 =head2 Good ideas waiting for round tuits
1231
1232 =over 4
1233
1234 =item Configure -Dsrc=/blah/blah
1235
1236 We should be able to emulate B<configure --srcdir>.  Tom Tromey
1237 tromey@creche.cygnus.com has submitted some patches to
1238 the dist-users mailing list along these lines.  They have been folded
1239 back into the main distribution, but various parts of the perl
1240 Configure/build/install process still assume src='.'.
1241
1242 =item Hint file fixes
1243
1244 Various hint files work around Configure problems.  We ought to fix
1245 Configure so that most of them aren't needed.
1246
1247 =item Hint file information
1248
1249 Some of the hint file information (particularly dynamic loading stuff)
1250 ought to be fed back into the main metaconfig distribution.
1251
1252 =back
1253
1254 =head2 Probably good ideas waiting for round tuits
1255
1256 =over 4
1257
1258 =item GNU configure --options
1259
1260 I've received sensible suggestions for --exec_prefix and other
1261 GNU configure --options.  It's not always obvious exactly what is
1262 intended, but this merits investigation.
1263
1264 =item Try gcc if cc fails
1265
1266 Currently, we just give up.
1267
1268 =item bypassing safe*alloc wrappers
1269
1270 On some systems, it may be safe to call the system malloc directly
1271 without going through the util.c safe* layers.  (Such systems would
1272 accept free(0), for example.)  This might be a time-saver for systems
1273 that already have a good malloc.  (Recent Linux libc's apparently have
1274 a nice malloc that is well-tuned for the system.)
1275
1276 =back
1277
1278 =head2 Vague possibilities
1279
1280 =over 4
1281
1282 =item gconvert replacement
1283
1284 Maybe include a replacement function that doesn't lose data in rare
1285 cases of coercion between string and numerical values.
1286
1287 =item Improve makedepend
1288
1289 The current makedepend process is clunky and annoyingly slow, but it
1290 works for most folks.  Alas, it assumes that there is a filename
1291 $firstmakefile that the B<make> command will try to use before it uses
1292 F<Makefile>.  Such may not be the case for all B<make> commands,
1293 particularly those on non-Unix systems.
1294
1295 Probably some variant of the BSD F<.depend> file will be useful.
1296 We ought to check how other packages do this, if they do it at all.
1297 We could probably pre-generate the dependencies (with the exception of
1298 malloc.o, which could probably be determined at F<Makefile.SH>
1299 extraction time.
1300
1301 =item GNU Makefile standard targets
1302
1303 GNU software generally has standardized Makefile targets.  Unless we
1304 have good reason to do otherwise, I see no reason not to support them.
1305
1306 =item File locking
1307
1308 Somehow, straighten out, document, and implement lockf(), flock(),
1309 and/or fcntl() file locking.  It's a mess.  See $d_fcntl_can_lock
1310 in recent config.sh files though.
1311
1312 =back
1313
1314 =head2 Copyright Issues
1315
1316 The following is based on the consensus of a couple of IPR lawyers,
1317 but it is of course not a legally binding statement, just a common
1318 sense summary.
1319
1320 =over 4
1321
1322 =item *
1323
1324 Tacking on copyright statements is unnecessary to begin with because
1325 of the Berne convention.  But assuming you want to go ahead...
1326
1327 =item *
1328
1329 The right form of a copyright statement is
1330
1331         Copyright (C) Year, Year, ... by Someone
1332
1333 The (C) is not required everywhere but it doesn't hurt and in certain
1334 jurisdictions it is required, so let's leave it in.  (Yes, it's true
1335 that in some jurisdictions the "(C)" is not legally binding, one should
1336 use the true ringed-C.  But we don't have that character available for
1337 Perl's source code.)
1338
1339 The years must be listed out separately.  Year-Year is not correct.
1340 Only the years when the piece has changed 'significantly' may be added.
1341
1342 =item *
1343
1344 One cannot give away one's copyright trivially.  One can give one's
1345 copyright away by using public domain, but even that requires a little
1346 bit more than just saying 'this is in public domain'.  (What it
1347 exactly requires depends on your jurisdiction.)  But barring public
1348 domain, one cannot "transfer" one's copyright to another person or
1349 entity.  In the context of software, it means that contributors cannot
1350 give away their copyright or "transfer" it to the "owner" of the software.
1351
1352 Also remember that in many cases if you are employed by someone,
1353 your work may be copyrighted to your employer, even when you are
1354 contributing on your own time (this all depends on too many things
1355 to list here).  But the bottom line is that you definitely can't give
1356 away a copyright you may not even have.
1357
1358 What is possible, however, is that the software can simply state
1359
1360         Copyright (C) Year, Year, ... by Someone and others
1361
1362 and then list the "others" somewhere in the distribution.
1363 And this is exactly what Perl does.  (The "somewhere" is
1364 AUTHORS and the Changes* files.)
1365
1366 =item *
1367
1368 Split files, merged files, and generated files are problematic.
1369 The rule of thumb: in split files, copy the copyright years of
1370 the original file to all the new files; in merged files make
1371 an union of the copyright years of all the old files; in generated
1372 files propagate the copyright years of the generating file(s).
1373
1374 =item *
1375
1376 The files of Perl source code distribution do carry a lot of
1377 copyrights, by various people.  (There are many copyrights embedded in
1378 perl.c, for example.)  The most straightforward thing for pumpkings to
1379 do is to simply update Larry's copyrights at the beginning of the
1380 *.[hcy], *.pl, and README files, and leave all other
1381 copyrights alone.  Doing more than that requires quite a bit of tracking. 
1382
1383 =back
1384
1385 =head1 AUTHORS
1386
1387 Original author:  Andy Dougherty doughera@lafayette.edu .
1388 Additions by Chip Salzenberg chip@perl.com and 
1389 Tim Bunce Tim.Bunce@ig.co.uk .
1390
1391 All opinions expressed herein are those of the authorZ<>(s).
1392
1393 =head1 LAST MODIFIED
1394
1395 2009-07-08-01 Jesse Vincent