RE: How to load a "loadable object" that has a non-default file extension ?
[perl.git] / pod / perltrap.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perltrap - Perl traps for the unwary
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 The biggest trap of all is forgetting to C<use warnings> or use the B<-w>
8 switch; see L<perllexwarn> and L<perlrun>. The second biggest trap is not
9 making your entire program runnable under C<use strict>.  The third biggest
10 trap is not reading the list of changes in this version of Perl; see
11 L<perldelta>.
12
13 =head2 Awk Traps
14
15 Accustomed B<awk> users should take special note of the following:
16
17 =over 4
18
19 =item *
20
21 A Perl program executes only once, not once for each input line.  You can
22 do an implicit loop with C<-n> or C<-p>.
23
24 =item *
25
26 The English module, loaded via
27
28     use English;
29
30 allows you to refer to special variables (like C<$/>) with names (like
31 $RS), as though they were in B<awk>; see L<perlvar> for details.
32
33 =item *
34
35 Semicolons are required after all simple statements in Perl (except
36 at the end of a block).  Newline is not a statement delimiter.
37
38 =item *
39
40 Curly brackets are required on C<if>s and C<while>s.
41
42 =item *
43
44 Variables begin with "$", "@" or "%" in Perl.
45
46 =item *
47
48 Arrays index from 0.  Likewise string positions in substr() and
49 index().
50
51 =item *
52
53 You have to decide whether your array has numeric or string indices.
54
55 =item *
56
57 Hash values do not spring into existence upon mere reference.
58
59 =item *
60
61 You have to decide whether you want to use string or numeric
62 comparisons.
63
64 =item *
65
66 Reading an input line does not split it for you.  You get to split it
67 to an array yourself.  And the split() operator has different
68 arguments than B<awk>'s.
69
70 =item *
71
72 The current input line is normally in $_, not $0.  It generally does
73 not have the newline stripped.  ($0 is the name of the program
74 executed.)  See L<perlvar>.
75
76 =item *
77
78 $<I<digit>> does not refer to fields--it refers to substrings matched
79 by the last match pattern.
80
81 =item *
82
83 The print() statement does not add field and record separators unless
84 you set C<$,> and C<$\>.  You can set $OFS and $ORS if you're using
85 the English module.
86
87 =item *
88
89 You must open your files before you print to them.
90
91 =item *
92
93 The range operator is "..", not comma.  The comma operator works as in
94 C.
95
96 =item *
97
98 The match operator is "=~", not "~".  ("~" is the one's complement
99 operator, as in C.)
100
101 =item *
102
103 The exponentiation operator is "**", not "^".  "^" is the XOR
104 operator, as in C.  (You know, one could get the feeling that B<awk> is
105 basically incompatible with C.)
106
107 =item *
108
109 The concatenation operator is ".", not the null string.  (Using the
110 null string would render C</pat/ /pat/> unparsable, because the third slash
111 would be interpreted as a division operator--the tokenizer is in fact
112 slightly context sensitive for operators like "/", "?", and ">".
113 And in fact, "." itself can be the beginning of a number.)
114
115 =item *
116
117 The C<next>, C<exit>, and C<continue> keywords work differently.
118
119 =item *
120
121
122 The following variables work differently:
123
124       Awk       Perl
125       ARGC      scalar @ARGV (compare with $#ARGV)
126       ARGV[0]   $0
127       FILENAME  $ARGV
128       FNR       $. - something
129       FS        (whatever you like)
130       NF        $#Fld, or some such
131       NR        $.
132       OFMT      $#
133       OFS       $,
134       ORS       $\
135       RLENGTH   length($&)
136       RS        $/
137       RSTART    length($`)
138       SUBSEP    $;
139
140 =item *
141
142 You cannot set $RS to a pattern, only a string.
143
144 =item *
145
146 When in doubt, run the B<awk> construct through B<a2p> and see what it
147 gives you.
148
149 =back
150
151 =head2 C/C++ Traps
152
153 Cerebral C and C++ programmers should take note of the following:
154
155 =over 4
156
157 =item *
158
159 Curly brackets are required on C<if>'s and C<while>'s.
160
161 =item *
162
163 You must use C<elsif> rather than C<else if>.
164
165 =item *
166
167 The C<break> and C<continue> keywords from C become in Perl C<last>
168 and C<next>, respectively.  Unlike in C, these do I<not> work within a
169 C<do { } while> construct.  See L<perlsyn/"Loop Control">.
170
171 =item *
172
173 There's no switch statement.  (But it's easy to build one on the fly,
174 see L<perlsyn/"Basic BLOCKs and Switch Statements">)
175
176 =item *
177
178 Variables begin with "$", "@" or "%" in Perl.
179
180 =item *
181
182 Comments begin with "#", not "/*" or "//".  Perl may interpret C/C++
183 comments as division operators, unterminated regular expressions or
184 the defined-or operator.
185
186 =item *
187
188 You can't take the address of anything, although a similar operator
189 in Perl is the backslash, which creates a reference.
190
191 =item *
192
193 C<ARGV> must be capitalized.  C<$ARGV[0]> is C's C<argv[1]>, and C<argv[0]>
194 ends up in C<$0>.
195
196 =item *
197
198 System calls such as link(), unlink(), rename(), etc. return nonzero for
199 success, not 0. (system(), however, returns zero for success.)
200
201 =item *
202
203 Signal handlers deal with signal names, not numbers.  Use C<kill -l>
204 to find their names on your system.
205
206 =back
207
208 =head2 Sed Traps
209
210 Seasoned B<sed> programmers should take note of the following:
211
212 =over 4
213
214 =item *
215
216 A Perl program executes only once, not once for each input line.  You can
217 do an implicit loop with C<-n> or C<-p>.
218
219 =item *
220
221 Backreferences in substitutions use "$" rather than "\".
222
223 =item *
224
225 The pattern matching metacharacters "(", ")", and "|" do not have backslashes
226 in front.
227
228 =item *
229
230 The range operator is C<...>, rather than comma.
231
232 =back
233
234 =head2 Shell Traps
235
236 Sharp shell programmers should take note of the following:
237
238 =over 4
239
240 =item *
241
242 The backtick operator does variable interpolation without regard to
243 the presence of single quotes in the command.
244
245 =item *
246
247 The backtick operator does no translation of the return value, unlike B<csh>.
248
249 =item *
250
251 Shells (especially B<csh>) do several levels of substitution on each
252 command line.  Perl does substitution in only certain constructs
253 such as double quotes, backticks, angle brackets, and search patterns.
254
255 =item *
256
257 Shells interpret scripts a little bit at a time.  Perl compiles the
258 entire program before executing it (except for C<BEGIN> blocks, which
259 execute at compile time).
260
261 =item *
262
263 The arguments are available via @ARGV, not $1, $2, etc.
264
265 =item *
266
267 The environment is not automatically made available as separate scalar
268 variables.
269
270 =item *
271
272 The shell's C<test> uses "=", "!=", "<" etc for string comparisons and "-eq",
273 "-ne", "-lt" etc for numeric comparisons. This is the reverse of Perl, which
274 uses C<eq>, C<ne>, C<lt> for string comparisons, and C<==>, C<!=> C<< < >> etc
275 for numeric comparisons.
276
277 =back
278
279 =head2 Perl Traps
280
281 Practicing Perl Programmers should take note of the following:
282
283 =over 4
284
285 =item *
286
287 Remember that many operations behave differently in a list
288 context than they do in a scalar one.  See L<perldata> for details.
289
290 =item *
291
292 Avoid barewords if you can, especially all lowercase ones.
293 You can't tell by just looking at it whether a bareword is
294 a function or a string.  By using quotes on strings and
295 parentheses on function calls, you won't ever get them confused.
296
297 =item *
298
299 You cannot discern from mere inspection which builtins
300 are unary operators (like chop() and chdir())
301 and which are list operators (like print() and unlink()).
302 (Unless prototyped, user-defined subroutines can B<only> be list
303 operators, never unary ones.)  See L<perlop> and L<perlsub>.
304
305 =item *
306
307 People have a hard time remembering that some functions
308 default to $_, or @ARGV, or whatever, but that others which
309 you might expect to do not.
310
311 =item *
312
313 The <FH> construct is not the name of the filehandle, it is a readline
314 operation on that handle.  The data read is assigned to $_ only if the
315 file read is the sole condition in a while loop:
316
317     while (<FH>)      { }
318     while (defined($_ = <FH>)) { }..
319     <FH>;  # data discarded!
320
321 =item *
322
323 Remember not to use C<=> when you need C<=~>;
324 these two constructs are quite different:
325
326     $x =  /foo/;
327     $x =~ /foo/;
328
329 =item *
330
331 The C<do {}> construct isn't a real loop that you can use
332 loop control on.
333
334 =item *
335
336 Use C<my()> for local variables whenever you can get away with
337 it (but see L<perlform> for where you can't).
338 Using C<local()> actually gives a local value to a global
339 variable, which leaves you open to unforeseen side-effects
340 of dynamic scoping.
341
342 =item *
343
344 If you localize an exported variable in a module, its exported value will
345 not change.  The local name becomes an alias to a new value but the
346 external name is still an alias for the original.
347
348 =back
349
350 =head2 Perl4 to Perl5 Traps
351
352 Practicing Perl4 Programmers should take note of the following
353 Perl4-to-Perl5 specific traps.
354
355 They're crudely ordered according to the following list:
356
357 =over 4
358
359 =item Discontinuance, Deprecation, and BugFix traps
360
361 Anything that's been fixed as a perl4 bug, removed as a perl4 feature
362 or deprecated as a perl4 feature with the intent to encourage usage of
363 some other perl5 feature.
364
365 =item Parsing Traps
366
367 Traps that appear to stem from the new parser.
368
369 =item Numerical Traps
370
371 Traps having to do with numerical or mathematical operators.
372
373 =item General data type traps
374
375 Traps involving perl standard data types.
376
377 =item Context Traps - scalar, list contexts
378
379 Traps related to context within lists, scalar statements/declarations.
380
381 =item Precedence Traps
382
383 Traps related to the precedence of parsing, evaluation, and execution of
384 code.
385
386 =item General Regular Expression Traps using s///, etc.
387
388 Traps related to the use of pattern matching.
389
390 =item Subroutine, Signal, Sorting Traps
391
392 Traps related to the use of signals and signal handlers, general subroutines,
393 and sorting, along with sorting subroutines.
394
395 =item OS Traps
396
397 OS-specific traps.
398
399 =item DBM Traps
400
401 Traps specific to the use of C<dbmopen()>, and specific dbm implementations.
402
403 =item Unclassified Traps
404
405 Everything else.
406
407 =back
408
409 If you find an example of a conversion trap that is not listed here,
410 please submit it to <F<perlbug@perl.org>> for inclusion.
411 Also note that at least some of these can be caught with the
412 C<use warnings> pragma or the B<-w> switch.
413
414 =head2 Discontinuance, Deprecation, and BugFix traps
415
416 Anything that has been discontinued, deprecated, or fixed as
417 a bug from perl4.
418
419 =over 4
420
421 =item * Symbols starting with "_" no longer forced into main
422
423 Symbols starting with "_" are no longer forced into package main, except
424 for C<$_> itself (and C<@_>, etc.).
425
426     package test;
427     $_legacy = 1;
428
429     package main;
430     print "\$_legacy is ",$_legacy,"\n";
431
432     # perl4 prints: $_legacy is 1
433     # perl5 prints: $_legacy is
434
435 =item * Double-colon valid package separator in variable name
436
437 Double-colon is now a valid package separator in a variable name.  Thus these
438 behave differently in perl4 vs. perl5, because the packages don't exist.
439
440     $a=1;$b=2;$c=3;$var=4;
441     print "$a::$b::$c ";
442     print "$var::abc::xyz\n";
443
444     # perl4 prints: 1::2::3 4::abc::xyz
445     # perl5 prints: 3
446
447 Given that C<::> is now the preferred package delimiter, it is debatable
448 whether this should be classed as a bug or not.
449 (The older package delimiter, ' ,is used here)
450
451     $x = 10;
452     print "x=${'x}\n";
453
454     # perl4 prints: x=10
455     # perl5 prints: Can't find string terminator "'" anywhere before EOF
456
457 You can avoid this problem, and remain compatible with perl4, if you
458 always explicitly include the package name:
459
460     $x = 10;
461     print "x=${main'x}\n";
462
463 Also see precedence traps, for parsing C<$:>.
464
465 =item * 2nd and 3rd args to C<splice()> are now in scalar context
466
467 The second and third arguments of C<splice()> are now evaluated in scalar
468 context (as the Camel says) rather than list context.
469
470     sub sub1{return(0,2) }          # return a 2-element list
471     sub sub2{ return(1,2,3)}        # return a 3-element list
472     @a1 = ("a","b","c","d","e");
473     @a2 = splice(@a1,&sub1,&sub2);
474     print join(' ',@a2),"\n";
475
476     # perl4 prints: a b
477     # perl5 prints: c d e
478
479 =item * Can't do C<goto> into a block that is optimized away
480
481 You can't do a C<goto> into a block that is optimized away.  Darn.
482
483     goto marker1;
484
485     for(1){
486     marker1:
487         print "Here I is!\n";
488     }
489
490     # perl4 prints: Here I is!
491     # perl5 errors: Can't "goto" into the middle of a foreach loop
492
493 =item * Can't use whitespace as variable name or quote delimiter
494
495 It is no longer syntactically legal to use whitespace as the name
496 of a variable, or as a delimiter for any kind of quote construct.
497 Double darn.
498
499     $a = ("foo bar");
500     $b = q baz;
501     print "a is $a, b is $b\n";
502
503     # perl4 prints: a is foo bar, b is baz
504     # perl5 errors: Bareword found where operator expected
505
506 =item * C<while/if BLOCK BLOCK> gone
507
508 The archaic while/if BLOCK BLOCK syntax is no longer supported.
509
510     if { 1 } {
511         print "True!";
512     }
513     else {
514         print "False!";
515     }
516
517     # perl4 prints: True!
518     # perl5 errors: syntax error at test.pl line 1, near "if {"
519
520 =item * C<**> binds tighter than unary minus
521
522 The C<**> operator now binds more tightly than unary minus.
523 It was documented to work this way before, but didn't.
524
525     print -4**2,"\n";
526
527     # perl4 prints: 16
528     # perl5 prints: -16
529
530 =item * C<foreach> changed when iterating over a list
531
532 The meaning of C<foreach{}> has changed slightly when it is iterating over a
533 list which is not an array.  This used to assign the list to a
534 temporary array, but no longer does so (for efficiency).  This means
535 that you'll now be iterating over the actual values, not over copies of
536 the values.  Modifications to the loop variable can change the original
537 values.
538
539     @list = ('ab','abc','bcd','def');
540     foreach $var (grep(/ab/,@list)){
541         $var = 1;
542     }
543     print (join(':',@list));
544
545     # perl4 prints: ab:abc:bcd:def
546     # perl5 prints: 1:1:bcd:def
547
548 To retain Perl4 semantics you need to assign your list
549 explicitly to a temporary array and then iterate over that.  For
550 example, you might need to change
551
552     foreach $var (grep(/ab/,@list)){
553
554 to
555
556     foreach $var (@tmp = grep(/ab/,@list)){
557
558 Otherwise changing $var will clobber the values of @list.  (This most often
559 happens when you use C<$_> for the loop variable, and call subroutines in
560 the loop that don't properly localize C<$_>.)
561
562 =item * C<split> with no args behavior changed
563
564 C<split> with no arguments now behaves like C<split ' '> (which doesn't
565 return an initial null field if $_ starts with whitespace), it used to
566 behave like C<split /\s+/> (which does).
567
568     $_ = ' hi mom';
569     print join(':', split);
570
571     # perl4 prints: :hi:mom
572     # perl5 prints: hi:mom
573
574 =item * B<-e> behavior fixed
575
576 Perl 4 would ignore any text which was attached to an B<-e> switch,
577 always taking the code snippet from the following arg.  Additionally, it
578 would silently accept an B<-e> switch without a following arg.  Both of
579 these behaviors have been fixed.
580
581     perl -e'print "attached to -e"' 'print "separate arg"'
582
583     # perl4 prints: separate arg
584     # perl5 prints: attached to -e
585
586     perl -e
587
588     # perl4 prints:
589     # perl5 dies: No code specified for -e.
590
591 =item * C<push> returns number of elements in resulting list
592
593 In Perl 4 the return value of C<push> was undocumented, but it was
594 actually the last value being pushed onto the target list.  In Perl 5
595 the return value of C<push> is documented, but has changed, it is the
596 number of elements in the resulting list.
597
598     @x = ('existing');
599     print push(@x, 'first new', 'second new');
600
601     # perl4 prints: second new
602     # perl5 prints: 3
603
604 =item * Some error messages differ
605
606 Some error messages will be different.
607
608 =item * C<split()> honors subroutine args
609
610 In Perl 4, if in list context the delimiters to the first argument of
611 C<split()> were C<??>, the result would be placed in C<@_> as well as
612 being returned.   Perl 5 has more respect for your subroutine arguments.
613
614 =item * Bugs removed
615
616 Some bugs may have been inadvertently removed.  :-)
617
618 =back
619
620 =head2 Parsing Traps
621
622 Perl4-to-Perl5 traps from having to do with parsing.
623
624 =over 4
625
626 =item * Space between . and = triggers syntax error
627
628 Note the space between . and =
629
630     $string . = "more string";
631     print $string;
632
633     # perl4 prints: more string
634     # perl5 prints: syntax error at - line 1, near ". ="
635
636 =item * Better parsing in perl 5
637
638 Better parsing in perl 5
639
640     sub foo {}
641     &foo
642     print("hello, world\n");
643
644     # perl4 prints: hello, world
645     # perl5 prints: syntax error
646
647 =item * Function parsing
648
649 "if it looks like a function, it is a function" rule.
650
651   print
652     ($foo == 1) ? "is one\n" : "is zero\n";
653
654     # perl4 prints: is zero
655     # perl5 warns: "Useless use of a constant in void context" if using -w
656
657 =item * String interpolation of C<$#array> differs
658
659 String interpolation of the C<$#array> construct differs when braces
660 are to used around the name.
661
662     @a = (1..3);
663     print "${#a}";
664
665     # perl4 prints: 2
666     # perl5 fails with syntax error
667
668     @ = (1..3);
669     print "$#{a}";
670
671     # perl4 prints: {a}
672     # perl5 prints: 2
673
674 =item * Perl guesses on C<map>, C<grep> followed by C<{> if it starts BLOCK or hash ref
675
676 When perl sees C<map {> (or C<grep {>), it has to guess whether the C<{>
677 starts a BLOCK or a hash reference. If it guesses wrong, it will report
678 a syntax error near the C<}> and the missing (or unexpected) comma.
679
680 Use unary C<+> before C<{> on a hash reference, and unary C<+> applied
681 to the first thing in a BLOCK (after C<{>), for perl to guess right all
682 the time. (See L<perlfunc/map>.)
683
684 =back
685
686 =head2 Numerical Traps
687
688 Perl4-to-Perl5 traps having to do with numerical operators,
689 operands, or output from same.
690
691 =over 5
692
693 =item * Formatted output and significant digits
694
695 Formatted output and significant digits.  In general, Perl 5
696 tries to be more precise.  For example, on a Solaris Sparc:
697
698     print 7.373504 - 0, "\n";
699     printf "%20.18f\n", 7.373504 - 0;
700
701     # Perl4 prints:
702     7.3750399999999996141
703     7.375039999999999614
704
705     # Perl5 prints:
706     7.373504
707     7.375039999999999614
708
709 Notice how the first result looks better in Perl 5.
710
711 Your results may vary, since your floating point formatting routines
712 and even floating point format may be slightly different.
713
714 =item * Auto-increment operator over signed int limit deleted
715
716 This specific item has been deleted.  It demonstrated how the auto-increment
717 operator would not catch when a number went over the signed int limit.  Fixed
718 in version 5.003_04.  But always be wary when using large integers.
719 If in doubt:
720
721    use Math::BigInt;
722
723 =item * Assignment of return values from numeric equality tests doesn't work
724
725 Assignment of return values from numeric equality tests
726 does not work in perl5 when the test evaluates to false (0).
727 Logical tests now return a null, instead of 0
728
729     $p = ($test == 1);
730     print $p,"\n";
731
732     # perl4 prints: 0
733     # perl5 prints:
734
735 Also see L<"General Regular Expression Traps using s///, etc.">
736 for another example of this new feature...
737
738 =item * Bitwise string ops
739
740 When bitwise operators which can operate upon either numbers or
741 strings (C<& | ^ ~>) are given only strings as arguments, perl4 would
742 treat the operands as bitstrings so long as the program contained a call
743 to the C<vec()> function. perl5 treats the string operands as bitstrings.
744 (See L<perlop/Bitwise String Operators> for more details.)
745
746     $fred = "10";
747     $barney = "12";
748     $betty = $fred & $barney;
749     print "$betty\n";
750     # Uncomment the next line to change perl4's behavior
751     # ($dummy) = vec("dummy", 0, 0);
752
753     # Perl4 prints:
754     8
755
756     # Perl5 prints:
757     10
758
759     # If vec() is used anywhere in the program, both print:
760     10
761
762 =back
763
764 =head2 General data type traps
765
766 Perl4-to-Perl5 traps involving most data-types, and their usage
767 within certain expressions and/or context.
768
769 =over 5
770
771 =item * Negative array subscripts now count from the end of array
772
773 Negative array subscripts now count from the end of the array.
774
775     @a = (1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
776     print "The third element of the array is $a[3] also expressed as $a[-2] \n";
777
778     # perl4 prints: The third element of the array is 4 also expressed as
779     # perl5 prints: The third element of the array is 4 also expressed as 4
780
781 =item * Setting C<$#array> lower now discards array elements
782
783 Setting C<$#array> lower now discards array elements, and makes them
784 impossible to recover.
785
786     @a = (a,b,c,d,e);
787     print "Before: ",join('',@a);
788     $#a =1;
789     print ", After: ",join('',@a);
790     $#a =3;
791     print ", Recovered: ",join('',@a),"\n";
792
793     # perl4 prints: Before: abcde, After: ab, Recovered: abcd
794     # perl5 prints: Before: abcde, After: ab, Recovered: ab
795
796 =item * Hashes get defined before use
797
798 Hashes get defined before use
799
800     local($s,@a,%h);
801     die "scalar \$s defined" if defined($s);
802     die "array \@a defined" if defined(@a);
803     die "hash \%h defined" if defined(%h);
804
805     # perl4 prints:
806     # perl5 dies: hash %h defined
807
808 Perl will now generate a warning when it sees defined(@a) and
809 defined(%h).
810
811 =item * Glob assignment from localized variable to variable
812
813 glob assignment from variable to variable will fail if the assigned
814 variable is localized subsequent to the assignment
815
816     @a = ("This is Perl 4");
817     *b = *a;
818     local(@a);
819     print @b,"\n";
820
821     # perl4 prints: This is Perl 4
822     # perl5 prints:
823
824 =item * Assigning C<undef> to glob
825
826 Assigning C<undef> to a glob has no effect in Perl 5.   In Perl 4
827 it undefines the associated scalar (but may have other side effects
828 including SEGVs). Perl 5 will also warn if C<undef> is assigned to a
829 typeglob. (Note that assigning C<undef> to a typeglob is different
830 than calling the C<undef> function on a typeglob (C<undef *foo>), which
831 has quite a few effects.
832
833     $foo = "bar";
834     *foo = undef;
835     print $foo;
836
837     # perl4 prints:
838     # perl4 warns: "Use of uninitialized variable" if using -w
839     # perl5 prints: bar
840     # perl5 warns: "Undefined value assigned to typeglob" if using -w
841
842 =item * Changes in unary negation (of strings)
843
844 Changes in unary negation (of strings)
845 This change effects both the return value and what it
846 does to auto(magic)increment.
847
848     $x = "aaa";
849     print ++$x," : ";
850     print -$x," : ";
851     print ++$x,"\n";
852
853     # perl4 prints: aab : -0 : 1
854     # perl5 prints: aab : -aab : aac
855
856 =item * Modifying of constants prohibited
857
858 perl 4 lets you modify constants:
859
860     $foo = "x";
861     &mod($foo);
862     for ($x = 0; $x < 3; $x++) {
863         &mod("a");
864     }
865     sub mod {
866         print "before: $_[0]";
867         $_[0] = "m";
868         print "  after: $_[0]\n";
869     }
870
871     # perl4:
872     # before: x  after: m
873     # before: a  after: m
874     # before: m  after: m
875     # before: m  after: m
876
877     # Perl5:
878     # before: x  after: m
879     # Modification of a read-only value attempted at foo.pl line 12.
880     # before: a
881
882 =item * C<defined $var> behavior changed
883
884 The behavior is slightly different for:
885
886     print "$x", defined $x
887
888     # perl 4: 1
889     # perl 5: <no output, $x is not called into existence>
890
891 =item * Variable Suicide
892
893 Variable suicide behavior is more consistent under Perl 5.
894 Perl5 exhibits the same behavior for hashes and scalars,
895 that perl4 exhibits for only scalars.
896
897     $aGlobal{ "aKey" } = "global value";
898     print "MAIN:", $aGlobal{"aKey"}, "\n";
899     $GlobalLevel = 0;
900     &test( *aGlobal );
901
902     sub test {
903         local( *theArgument ) = @_;
904         local( %aNewLocal ); # perl 4 != 5.001l,m
905         $aNewLocal{"aKey"} = "this should never appear";
906         print "SUB: ", $theArgument{"aKey"}, "\n";
907         $aNewLocal{"aKey"} = "level $GlobalLevel";   # what should print
908         $GlobalLevel++;
909         if( $GlobalLevel<4 ) {
910             &test( *aNewLocal );
911         }
912     }
913
914     # Perl4:
915     # MAIN:global value
916     # SUB: global value
917     # SUB: level 0
918     # SUB: level 1
919     # SUB: level 2
920
921     # Perl5:
922     # MAIN:global value
923     # SUB: global value
924     # SUB: this should never appear
925     # SUB: this should never appear
926     # SUB: this should never appear
927
928 =back
929
930 =head2 Context Traps - scalar, list contexts
931
932 =over 5
933
934 =item * Elements of argument lists for formats evaluated in list context
935
936 The elements of argument lists for formats are now evaluated in list
937 context.  This means you can interpolate list values now.
938
939     @fmt = ("foo","bar","baz");
940     format STDOUT=
941     @<<<<< @||||| @>>>>>
942     @fmt;
943     .
944     write;
945
946     # perl4 errors:  Please use commas to separate fields in file
947     # perl5 prints: foo     bar      baz
948
949 =item * C<caller()> returns false value in scalar context if no caller present
950
951 The C<caller()> function now returns a false value in a scalar context
952 if there is no caller.  This lets library files determine if they're
953 being required.
954
955     caller() ? (print "You rang?\n") : (print "Got a 0\n");
956
957     # perl4 errors: There is no caller
958     # perl5 prints: Got a 0
959
960 =item * Comma operator in scalar context gives scalar context to args
961
962 The comma operator in a scalar context is now guaranteed to give a
963 scalar context to its arguments.
964
965     @y= ('a','b','c');
966     $x = (1, 2, @y);
967     print "x = $x\n";
968
969     # Perl4 prints:  x = c   # Thinks list context interpolates list
970     # Perl5 prints:  x = 3   # Knows scalar uses length of list
971
972 =item * C<sprintf()> prototyped as C<($;@)>
973
974 C<sprintf()> is prototyped as ($;@), so its first argument is given scalar
975 context. Thus, if passed an array, it will probably not do what you want,
976 unlike Perl 4:
977
978     @z = ('%s%s', 'foo', 'bar');
979     $x = sprintf(@z);
980     print $x;
981
982     # perl4 prints: foobar
983     # perl5 prints: 3
984
985 C<printf()> works the same as it did in Perl 4, though:
986
987     @z = ('%s%s', 'foo', 'bar');
988     printf STDOUT (@z);
989
990     # perl4 prints: foobar
991     # perl5 prints: foobar
992
993 =back
994
995 =head2 Precedence Traps
996
997 Perl4-to-Perl5 traps involving precedence order.
998
999 Perl 4 has almost the same precedence rules as Perl 5 for the operators
1000 that they both have.  Perl 4 however, seems to have had some
1001 inconsistencies that made the behavior differ from what was documented.
1002
1003 =over 5
1004
1005 =item * LHS vs. RHS of any assignment operator
1006
1007 LHS vs. RHS of any assignment operator.  LHS is evaluated first
1008 in perl4, second in perl5; this can affect the relationship
1009 between side-effects in sub-expressions.
1010
1011     @arr = ( 'left', 'right' );
1012     $a{shift @arr} = shift @arr;
1013     print join( ' ', keys %a );
1014
1015     # perl4 prints: left
1016     # perl5 prints: right
1017
1018 =item * Semantic errors introduced due to precedence
1019
1020 These are now semantic errors because of precedence:
1021
1022     @list = (1,2,3,4,5);
1023     %map = ("a",1,"b",2,"c",3,"d",4);
1024     $n = shift @list + 2;   # first item in list plus 2
1025     print "n is $n, ";
1026     $m = keys %map + 2;     # number of items in hash plus 2
1027     print "m is $m\n";
1028
1029     # perl4 prints: n is 3, m is 6
1030     # perl5 errors and fails to compile
1031
1032 =item * Precedence of assignment operators same as the precedence of assignment
1033
1034 The precedence of assignment operators is now the same as the precedence
1035 of assignment.  Perl 4 mistakenly gave them the precedence of the associated
1036 operator.  So you now must parenthesize them in expressions like
1037
1038     /foo/ ? ($a += 2) : ($a -= 2);
1039
1040 Otherwise
1041
1042     /foo/ ? $a += 2 : $a -= 2
1043
1044 would be erroneously parsed as
1045
1046     (/foo/ ? $a += 2 : $a) -= 2;
1047
1048 On the other hand,
1049
1050     $a += /foo/ ? 1 : 2;
1051
1052 now works as a C programmer would expect.
1053
1054 =item * C<open> requires parentheses around filehandle
1055
1056     open FOO || die;
1057
1058 is now incorrect.  You need parentheses around the filehandle.
1059 Otherwise, perl5 leaves the statement as its default precedence:
1060
1061     open(FOO || die);
1062
1063     # perl4 opens or dies
1064     # perl5 opens FOO, dying only if 'FOO' is false, i.e. never
1065
1066 =item * C<$:> precedence over C<$::> gone
1067
1068 perl4 gives the special variable, C<$:> precedence, where perl5
1069 treats C<$::> as main C<package>
1070
1071     $a = "x"; print "$::a";
1072
1073     # perl 4 prints: -:a
1074     # perl 5 prints: x
1075
1076 =item * Precedence of file test operators documented
1077
1078 perl4 had buggy precedence for the file test operators vis-a-vis
1079 the assignment operators.  Thus, although the precedence table
1080 for perl4 leads one to believe C<-e $foo .= "q"> should parse as
1081 C<((-e $foo) .= "q")>, it actually parses as C<(-e ($foo .= "q"))>.
1082 In perl5, the precedence is as documented.
1083
1084     -e $foo .= "q"
1085
1086     # perl4 prints: no output
1087     # perl5 prints: Can't modify -e in concatenation
1088
1089 =item * C<keys>, C<each>, C<values> are regular named unary operators
1090
1091 In perl4, keys(), each() and values() were special high-precedence operators
1092 that operated on a single hash, but in perl5, they are regular named unary
1093 operators.  As documented, named unary operators have lower precedence
1094 than the arithmetic and concatenation operators C<+ - .>, but the perl4
1095 variants of these operators actually bind tighter than C<+ - .>.
1096 Thus, for:
1097
1098     %foo = 1..10;
1099     print keys %foo - 1
1100
1101     # perl4 prints: 4
1102     # perl5 prints: Type of arg 1 to keys must be hash (not subtraction)
1103
1104 The perl4 behavior was probably more useful, if less consistent.
1105
1106 =back
1107
1108 =head2 General Regular Expression Traps using s///, etc.
1109
1110 All types of RE traps.
1111
1112 =over 5
1113
1114 =item * C<s'$lhs'$rhs'> interpolates on either side
1115
1116 C<s'$lhs'$rhs'> now does no interpolation on either side.  It used to
1117 interpolate $lhs but not $rhs.  (And still does not match a literal
1118 '$' in string)
1119
1120     $a=1;$b=2;
1121     $string = '1 2 $a $b';
1122     $string =~ s'$a'$b';
1123     print $string,"\n";
1124
1125     # perl4 prints: $b 2 $a $b
1126     # perl5 prints: 1 2 $a $b
1127
1128 =item * C<m//g> attaches its state to the searched string
1129
1130 C<m//g> now attaches its state to the searched string rather than the
1131 regular expression.  (Once the scope of a block is left for the sub, the
1132 state of the searched string is lost)
1133
1134     $_ = "ababab";
1135     while(m/ab/g){
1136         &doit("blah");
1137     }
1138     sub doit{local($_) = shift; print "Got $_ "}
1139
1140     # perl4 prints: Got blah Got blah Got blah Got blah
1141     # perl5 prints: infinite loop blah...
1142
1143 =item * C<m//o> used within an anonymous sub
1144
1145 Currently, if you use the C<m//o> qualifier on a regular expression
1146 within an anonymous sub, I<all> closures generated from that anonymous
1147 sub will use the regular expression as it was compiled when it was used
1148 the very first time in any such closure.  For instance, if you say
1149
1150     sub build_match {
1151         my($left,$right) = @_;
1152         return sub { $_[0] =~ /$left stuff $right/o; };
1153     }
1154     $good = build_match('foo','bar');
1155     $bad = build_match('baz','blarch');
1156     print $good->('foo stuff bar') ? "ok\n" : "not ok\n";
1157     print $bad->('baz stuff blarch') ? "ok\n" : "not ok\n";
1158     print $bad->('foo stuff bar') ? "not ok\n" : "ok\n";
1159
1160 For most builds of Perl5, this will print:
1161 ok
1162 not ok
1163 not ok
1164
1165 build_match() will always return a sub which matches the contents of
1166 $left and $right as they were the I<first> time that build_match()
1167 was called, not as they are in the current call.
1168
1169 =item * C<$+> isn't set to whole match
1170
1171 If no parentheses are used in a match, Perl4 sets C<$+> to
1172 the whole match, just like C<$&>. Perl5 does not.
1173
1174     "abcdef" =~ /b.*e/;
1175     print "\$+ = $+\n";
1176
1177     # perl4 prints: bcde
1178     # perl5 prints:
1179
1180 =item * Substitution now returns null string if it fails
1181
1182 substitution now returns the null string if it fails
1183
1184     $string = "test";
1185     $value = ($string =~ s/foo//);
1186     print $value, "\n";
1187
1188     # perl4 prints: 0
1189     # perl5 prints:
1190
1191 Also see L<Numerical Traps> for another example of this new feature.
1192
1193 =item * C<s`lhs`rhs`> is now a normal substitution
1194
1195 C<s`lhs`rhs`> (using backticks) is now a normal substitution, with no
1196 backtick expansion
1197
1198     $string = "";
1199     $string =~ s`^`hostname`;
1200     print $string, "\n";
1201
1202     # perl4 prints: <the local hostname>
1203     # perl5 prints: hostname
1204
1205 =item * Stricter parsing of variables in regular expressions
1206
1207 Stricter parsing of variables used in regular expressions
1208
1209     s/^([^$grpc]*$grpc[$opt$plus$rep]?)//o;
1210
1211     # perl4: compiles w/o error
1212     # perl5: with Scalar found where operator expected ..., near "$opt$plus"
1213
1214 an added component of this example, apparently from the same script, is
1215 the actual value of the s'd string after the substitution.
1216 C<[$opt]> is a character class in perl4 and an array subscript in perl5
1217
1218     $grpc = 'a';
1219     $opt  = 'r';
1220     $_ = 'bar';
1221     s/^([^$grpc]*$grpc[$opt]?)/foo/;
1222     print;
1223
1224     # perl4 prints: foo
1225     # perl5 prints: foobar
1226
1227 =item * C<m?x?> matches only once
1228
1229 Under perl5, C<m?x?> matches only once, like C<?x?>. Under perl4, it matched
1230 repeatedly, like C</x/> or C<m!x!>.
1231
1232     $test = "once";
1233     sub match { $test =~ m?once?; }
1234     &match();
1235     if( &match() ) {
1236         # m?x? matches more then once
1237         print "perl4\n";
1238     } else {
1239         # m?x? matches only once
1240         print "perl5\n";
1241     }
1242
1243     # perl4 prints: perl4
1244     # perl5 prints: perl5
1245
1246 =item * Failed matches don't reset the match variables
1247
1248 Unlike in Ruby, failed matches in Perl do not reset the match variables
1249 ($1, $2, ..., C<$`>, ...).
1250
1251 =back
1252
1253 =head2 Subroutine, Signal, Sorting Traps
1254
1255 The general group of Perl4-to-Perl5 traps having to do with
1256 Signals, Sorting, and their related subroutines, as well as
1257 general subroutine traps.  Includes some OS-Specific traps.
1258
1259 =over 5
1260
1261 =item * Barewords that used to look like strings look like subroutine calls
1262
1263 Barewords that used to look like strings to Perl will now look like subroutine
1264 calls if a subroutine by that name is defined before the compiler sees them.
1265
1266     sub SeeYa { warn"Hasta la vista, baby!" }
1267     $SIG{'TERM'} = SeeYa;
1268     print "SIGTERM is now $SIG{'TERM'}\n";
1269
1270     # perl4 prints: SIGTERM is now main'SeeYa
1271     # perl5 prints: SIGTERM is now main::1 (and warns "Hasta la vista, baby!")
1272
1273 Use B<-w> to catch this one
1274
1275 =item * Reverse is no longer allowed as the name of a sort subroutine
1276
1277 reverse is no longer allowed as the name of a sort subroutine.
1278
1279     sub reverse{ print "yup "; $a <=> $b }
1280     print sort reverse (2,1,3);
1281
1282     # perl4 prints: yup yup 123
1283     # perl5 prints: 123
1284     # perl5 warns (if using -w): Ambiguous call resolved as CORE::reverse()
1285
1286 =item * C<warn()> won't let you specify a filehandle.
1287
1288 Although it _always_ printed to STDERR, warn() would let you specify a
1289 filehandle in perl4.  With perl5 it does not.
1290
1291     warn STDERR "Foo!";
1292
1293     # perl4 prints: Foo!
1294     # perl5 prints: String found where operator expected
1295
1296 =back
1297
1298 =head2 OS Traps
1299
1300 =over 5
1301
1302 =item * SysV resets signal handler correctly
1303
1304 Under HPUX, and some other SysV OSes, one had to reset any signal handler,
1305 within  the signal handler function, each time a signal was handled with
1306 perl4.  With perl5, the reset is now done correctly.  Any code relying
1307 on the handler _not_ being reset will have to be reworked.
1308
1309 Since version 5.002, Perl uses sigaction() under SysV.
1310
1311     sub gotit {
1312         print "Got @_... ";
1313     }
1314     $SIG{'INT'} = 'gotit';
1315
1316     $| = 1;
1317     $pid = fork;
1318     if ($pid) {
1319         kill('INT', $pid);
1320         sleep(1);
1321         kill('INT', $pid);
1322     } else {
1323         while (1) {sleep(10);}
1324     }
1325
1326     # perl4 (HPUX) prints: Got INT...
1327     # perl5 (HPUX) prints: Got INT... Got INT...
1328
1329 =item * SysV C<seek()> appends correctly
1330
1331 Under SysV OSes, C<seek()> on a file opened to append C<<< >> >>> now does
1332 the right thing w.r.t. the fopen() manpage. e.g., - When a file is opened
1333 for append,  it  is  impossible to overwrite information already in
1334 the file.
1335
1336     open(TEST,">>seek.test");
1337     $start = tell TEST;
1338     foreach(1 .. 9){
1339         print TEST "$_ ";
1340     }
1341     $end = tell TEST;
1342     seek(TEST,$start,0);
1343     print TEST "18 characters here";
1344
1345     # perl4 (solaris) seek.test has: 18 characters here
1346     # perl5 (solaris) seek.test has: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 18 characters here
1347
1348
1349
1350 =back
1351
1352 =head2 Interpolation Traps
1353
1354 Perl4-to-Perl5 traps having to do with how things get interpolated
1355 within certain expressions, statements, contexts, or whatever.
1356
1357 =over 5
1358
1359 =item * C<@> always interpolates an array in double-quotish strings
1360
1361 @ now always interpolates an array in double-quotish strings.
1362
1363     print "To: someone@somewhere.com\n";
1364
1365     # perl4 prints: To:someone@somewhere.com
1366     # perl < 5.6.1, error : In string, @somewhere now must be written as \@somewhere
1367     # perl >= 5.6.1, warning : Possible unintended interpolation of @somewhere in string
1368
1369 =item * Double-quoted strings may no longer end with an unescaped $
1370
1371 Double-quoted strings may no longer end with an unescaped $.
1372
1373     $foo = "foo$";
1374     print "foo is $foo\n";
1375
1376     # perl4 prints: foo is foo$
1377     # perl5 errors: Final $ should be \$ or $name
1378
1379 Note: perl5 DOES NOT error on the terminating @ in $bar
1380
1381 =item * Arbitrary expressions are evaluated inside braces within double quotes
1382
1383 Perl now sometimes evaluates arbitrary expressions inside braces that occur
1384 within double quotes (usually when the opening brace is preceded by C<$>
1385 or C<@>).
1386
1387     @www = "buz";
1388     $foo = "foo";
1389     $bar = "bar";
1390     sub foo { return "bar" };
1391     print "|@{w.w.w}|${main'foo}|";
1392
1393     # perl4 prints: |@{w.w.w}|foo|
1394     # perl5 prints: |buz|bar|
1395
1396 Note that you can C<use strict;> to ward off such trappiness under perl5.
1397
1398 =item * C<$$x> now tries to dereference $x
1399
1400 The construct "this is $$x" used to interpolate the pid at that point, but
1401 now tries to dereference $x.  C<$$> by itself still works fine, however.
1402
1403     $s = "a reference";
1404     $x = *s;
1405     print "this is $$x\n";
1406
1407     # perl4 prints: this is XXXx   (XXX is the current pid)
1408     # perl5 prints: this is a reference
1409
1410 =item * Creation of hashes on the fly with C<eval "EXPR"> requires protection
1411
1412 Creation of hashes on the fly with C<eval "EXPR"> now requires either both
1413 C<$>'s to be protected in the specification of the hash name, or both curlies
1414 to be protected.  If both curlies are protected, the result will be compatible
1415 with perl4 and perl5.  This is a very common practice, and should be changed
1416 to use the block form of C<eval{}>  if possible.
1417
1418     $hashname = "foobar";
1419     $key = "baz";
1420     $value = 1234;
1421     eval "\$$hashname{'$key'} = q|$value|";
1422     (defined($foobar{'baz'})) ?  (print "Yup") : (print "Nope");
1423
1424     # perl4 prints: Yup
1425     # perl5 prints: Nope
1426
1427 Changing
1428
1429     eval "\$$hashname{'$key'} = q|$value|";
1430
1431 to
1432
1433     eval "\$\$hashname{'$key'} = q|$value|";
1434
1435 causes the following result:
1436
1437     # perl4 prints: Nope
1438     # perl5 prints: Yup
1439
1440 or, changing to
1441
1442     eval "\$$hashname\{'$key'\} = q|$value|";
1443
1444 causes the following result:
1445
1446     # perl4 prints: Yup
1447     # perl5 prints: Yup
1448     # and is compatible for both versions
1449
1450
1451 =item * Bugs in earlier perl versions
1452
1453 perl4 programs which unconsciously rely on the bugs in earlier perl versions.
1454
1455     perl -e '$bar=q/not/; print "This is $foo{$bar} perl5"'
1456
1457     # perl4 prints: This is not perl5
1458     # perl5 prints: This is perl5
1459
1460 =item * Array and hash brackets during interpolation
1461
1462 You also have to be careful about array and hash brackets during
1463 interpolation.
1464
1465     print "$foo["
1466
1467     perl 4 prints: [
1468     perl 5 prints: syntax error
1469
1470     print "$foo{"
1471
1472     perl 4 prints: {
1473     perl 5 prints: syntax error
1474
1475 Perl 5 is expecting to find an index or key name following the respective
1476 brackets, as well as an ending bracket of the appropriate type.  In order
1477 to mimic the behavior of Perl 4, you must escape the bracket like so.
1478
1479     print "$foo\[";
1480     print "$foo\{";
1481
1482 =item * Interpolation of C<\$$foo{bar}>
1483
1484 Similarly, watch out for: C<\$$foo{bar}>
1485
1486     $foo = "baz";
1487     print "\$$foo{bar}\n";
1488
1489     # perl4 prints: $baz{bar}
1490     # perl5 prints: $
1491
1492 Perl 5 is looking for C<$foo{bar}> which doesn't exist, but perl 4 is
1493 happy just to expand $foo to "baz" by itself.  Watch out for this
1494 especially in C<eval>'s.
1495
1496 =item * C<qq()> string passed to C<eval> will not find string terminator
1497
1498 C<qq()> string passed to C<eval>
1499
1500     eval qq(
1501         foreach \$y (keys %\$x\) {
1502             \$count++;
1503         }
1504     );
1505
1506     # perl4 runs this ok
1507     # perl5 prints: Can't find string terminator ")"
1508
1509 =back
1510
1511 =head2 DBM Traps
1512
1513 General DBM traps.
1514
1515 =over 5
1516
1517 =item * Perl5 must have been linked with same dbm/ndbm as the default for C<dbmopen()>
1518
1519 Existing dbm databases created under perl4 (or any other dbm/ndbm tool)
1520 may cause the same script, run under perl5, to fail.  The build of perl5
1521 must have been linked with the same dbm/ndbm as the default for C<dbmopen()>
1522 to function properly without C<tie>'ing to an extension dbm implementation.
1523
1524     dbmopen (%dbm, "file", undef);
1525     print "ok\n";
1526
1527     # perl4 prints: ok
1528     # perl5 prints: ok (IFF linked with -ldbm or -lndbm)
1529
1530
1531 =item * DBM exceeding limit on the key/value size will cause perl5 to exit immediately
1532
1533 Existing dbm databases created under perl4 (or any other dbm/ndbm tool)
1534 may cause the same script, run under perl5, to fail.  The error generated
1535 when exceeding the limit on the key/value size will cause perl5 to exit
1536 immediately.
1537
1538     dbmopen(DB, "testdb",0600) || die "couldn't open db! $!";
1539     $DB{'trap'} = "x" x 1024;  # value too large for most dbm/ndbm
1540     print "YUP\n";
1541
1542     # perl4 prints:
1543     dbm store returned -1, errno 28, key "trap" at - line 3.
1544     YUP
1545
1546     # perl5 prints:
1547     dbm store returned -1, errno 28, key "trap" at - line 3.
1548
1549 =back
1550
1551 =head2 Unclassified Traps
1552
1553 Everything else.
1554
1555 =over 5
1556
1557 =item * C<require>/C<do> trap using returned value
1558
1559 If the file doit.pl has:
1560
1561     sub foo {
1562         $rc = do "./do.pl";
1563         return 8;
1564     }
1565     print &foo, "\n";
1566
1567 And the do.pl file has the following single line:
1568
1569     return 3;
1570
1571 Running doit.pl gives the following:
1572
1573     # perl 4 prints: 3 (aborts the subroutine early)
1574     # perl 5 prints: 8
1575
1576 Same behavior if you replace C<do> with C<require>.
1577
1578 =item * C<split> on empty string with LIMIT specified
1579
1580     $string = '';
1581     @list = split(/foo/, $string, 2)
1582
1583 Perl4 returns a one element list containing the empty string but Perl5
1584 returns an empty list.
1585
1586 =back
1587
1588 As always, if any of these are ever officially declared as bugs,
1589 they'll be fixed and removed.
1590