Create perldelta for 5.14.3
[perl.git] / pod / perlrequick.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perlrequick - Perl regular expressions quick start
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 This page covers the very basics of understanding, creating and
8 using regular expressions ('regexes') in Perl.
9
10
11 =head1 The Guide
12
13 =head2 Simple word matching
14
15 The simplest regex is simply a word, or more generally, a string of
16 characters.  A regex consisting of a word matches any string that
17 contains that word:
18
19     "Hello World" =~ /World/;  # matches
20
21 In this statement, C<World> is a regex and the C<//> enclosing
22 C</World/> tells Perl to search a string for a match.  The operator
23 C<=~> associates the string with the regex match and produces a true
24 value if the regex matched, or false if the regex did not match.  In
25 our case, C<World> matches the second word in C<"Hello World">, so the
26 expression is true.  This idea has several variations.
27
28 Expressions like this are useful in conditionals:
29
30     print "It matches\n" if "Hello World" =~ /World/;
31
32 The sense of the match can be reversed by using C<!~> operator:
33
34     print "It doesn't match\n" if "Hello World" !~ /World/;
35
36 The literal string in the regex can be replaced by a variable:
37
38     $greeting = "World";
39     print "It matches\n" if "Hello World" =~ /$greeting/;
40
41 If you're matching against C<$_>, the C<$_ =~> part can be omitted:
42
43     $_ = "Hello World";
44     print "It matches\n" if /World/;
45
46 Finally, the C<//> default delimiters for a match can be changed to
47 arbitrary delimiters by putting an C<'m'> out front:
48
49     "Hello World" =~ m!World!;   # matches, delimited by '!'
50     "Hello World" =~ m{World};   # matches, note the matching '{}'
51     "/usr/bin/perl" =~ m"/perl"; # matches after '/usr/bin',
52                                  # '/' becomes an ordinary char
53
54 Regexes must match a part of the string I<exactly> in order for the
55 statement to be true:
56
57     "Hello World" =~ /world/;  # doesn't match, case sensitive
58     "Hello World" =~ /o W/;    # matches, ' ' is an ordinary char
59     "Hello World" =~ /World /; # doesn't match, no ' ' at end
60
61 Perl will always match at the earliest possible point in the string:
62
63     "Hello World" =~ /o/;       # matches 'o' in 'Hello'
64     "That hat is red" =~ /hat/; # matches 'hat' in 'That'
65
66 Not all characters can be used 'as is' in a match.  Some characters,
67 called B<metacharacters>, are reserved for use in regex notation.
68 The metacharacters are
69
70     {}[]()^$.|*+?\
71
72 A metacharacter can be matched by putting a backslash before it:
73
74     "2+2=4" =~ /2+2/;    # doesn't match, + is a metacharacter
75     "2+2=4" =~ /2\+2/;   # matches, \+ is treated like an ordinary +
76     'C:\WIN32' =~ /C:\\WIN/;                       # matches
77     "/usr/bin/perl" =~ /\/usr\/bin\/perl/;  # matches
78
79 In the last regex, the forward slash C<'/'> is also backslashed,
80 because it is used to delimit the regex.
81
82 Non-printable ASCII characters are represented by B<escape sequences>.
83 Common examples are C<\t> for a tab, C<\n> for a newline, and C<\r>
84 for a carriage return.  Arbitrary bytes are represented by octal
85 escape sequences, e.g., C<\033>, or hexadecimal escape sequences,
86 e.g., C<\x1B>:
87
88     "1000\t2000" =~ m(0\t2)      # matches
89     "cat"      =~ /\143\x61\x74/ # matches in ASCII, but a weird way to spell cat
90
91 Regexes are treated mostly as double-quoted strings, so variable
92 substitution works:
93
94     $foo = 'house';
95     'cathouse' =~ /cat$foo/;   # matches
96     'housecat' =~ /${foo}cat/; # matches
97
98 With all of the regexes above, if the regex matched anywhere in the
99 string, it was considered a match.  To specify I<where> it should
100 match, we would use the B<anchor> metacharacters C<^> and C<$>.  The
101 anchor C<^> means match at the beginning of the string and the anchor
102 C<$> means match at the end of the string, or before a newline at the
103 end of the string.  Some examples:
104
105     "housekeeper" =~ /keeper/;         # matches
106     "housekeeper" =~ /^keeper/;        # doesn't match
107     "housekeeper" =~ /keeper$/;        # matches
108     "housekeeper\n" =~ /keeper$/;      # matches
109     "housekeeper" =~ /^housekeeper$/;  # matches
110
111 =head2 Using character classes
112
113 A B<character class> allows a set of possible characters, rather than
114 just a single character, to match at a particular point in a regex.
115 Character classes are denoted by brackets C<[...]>, with the set of
116 characters to be possibly matched inside.  Here are some examples:
117
118     /cat/;            # matches 'cat'
119     /[bcr]at/;        # matches 'bat', 'cat', or 'rat'
120     "abc" =~ /[cab]/; # matches 'a'
121
122 In the last statement, even though C<'c'> is the first character in
123 the class, the earliest point at which the regex can match is C<'a'>.
124
125     /[yY][eE][sS]/; # match 'yes' in a case-insensitive way
126                     # 'yes', 'Yes', 'YES', etc.
127     /yes/i;         # also match 'yes' in a case-insensitive way
128
129 The last example shows a match with an C<'i'> B<modifier>, which makes
130 the match case-insensitive.
131
132 Character classes also have ordinary and special characters, but the
133 sets of ordinary and special characters inside a character class are
134 different than those outside a character class.  The special
135 characters for a character class are C<-]\^$> and are matched using an
136 escape:
137
138    /[\]c]def/; # matches ']def' or 'cdef'
139    $x = 'bcr';
140    /[$x]at/;   # matches 'bat, 'cat', or 'rat'
141    /[\$x]at/;  # matches '$at' or 'xat'
142    /[\\$x]at/; # matches '\at', 'bat, 'cat', or 'rat'
143
144 The special character C<'-'> acts as a range operator within character
145 classes, so that the unwieldy C<[0123456789]> and C<[abc...xyz]>
146 become the svelte C<[0-9]> and C<[a-z]>:
147
148     /item[0-9]/;  # matches 'item0' or ... or 'item9'
149     /[0-9a-fA-F]/;  # matches a hexadecimal digit
150
151 If C<'-'> is the first or last character in a character class, it is
152 treated as an ordinary character.
153
154 The special character C<^> in the first position of a character class
155 denotes a B<negated character class>, which matches any character but
156 those in the brackets.  Both C<[...]> and C<[^...]> must match a
157 character, or the match fails.  Then
158
159     /[^a]at/;  # doesn't match 'aat' or 'at', but matches
160                # all other 'bat', 'cat, '0at', '%at', etc.
161     /[^0-9]/;  # matches a non-numeric character
162     /[a^]at/;  # matches 'aat' or '^at'; here '^' is ordinary
163
164 Perl has several abbreviations for common character classes. (These
165 definitions are those that Perl uses in ASCII mode with the C</a> modifier.
166 See L<perlrecharclass/Backslash sequences> for details.)
167
168 =over 4
169
170 =item *
171
172 \d is a digit and represents
173
174     [0-9]
175
176 =item *
177
178 \s is a whitespace character and represents
179
180     [\ \t\r\n\f]
181
182 =item *
183
184 \w is a word character (alphanumeric or _) and represents
185
186     [0-9a-zA-Z_]
187
188 =item *
189
190 \D is a negated \d; it represents any character but a digit
191
192     [^0-9]
193
194 =item *
195
196 \S is a negated \s; it represents any non-whitespace character
197
198     [^\s]
199
200 =item *
201
202 \W is a negated \w; it represents any non-word character
203
204     [^\w]
205
206 =item *
207
208 The period '.' matches any character but "\n"
209
210 =back
211
212 The C<\d\s\w\D\S\W> abbreviations can be used both inside and outside
213 of character classes.  Here are some in use:
214
215     /\d\d:\d\d:\d\d/; # matches a hh:mm:ss time format
216     /[\d\s]/;         # matches any digit or whitespace character
217     /\w\W\w/;         # matches a word char, followed by a
218                       # non-word char, followed by a word char
219     /..rt/;           # matches any two chars, followed by 'rt'
220     /end\./;          # matches 'end.'
221     /end[.]/;         # same thing, matches 'end.'
222
223 The S<B<word anchor> > C<\b> matches a boundary between a word
224 character and a non-word character C<\w\W> or C<\W\w>:
225
226     $x = "Housecat catenates house and cat";
227     $x =~ /\bcat/;  # matches cat in 'catenates'
228     $x =~ /cat\b/;  # matches cat in 'housecat'
229     $x =~ /\bcat\b/;  # matches 'cat' at end of string
230
231 In the last example, the end of the string is considered a word
232 boundary.
233
234 =head2 Matching this or that
235
236 We can match different character strings with the B<alternation>
237 metacharacter C<'|'>.  To match C<dog> or C<cat>, we form the regex
238 C<dog|cat>.  As before, Perl will try to match the regex at the
239 earliest possible point in the string.  At each character position,
240 Perl will first try to match the first alternative, C<dog>.  If
241 C<dog> doesn't match, Perl will then try the next alternative, C<cat>.
242 If C<cat> doesn't match either, then the match fails and Perl moves to
243 the next position in the string.  Some examples:
244
245     "cats and dogs" =~ /cat|dog|bird/;  # matches "cat"
246     "cats and dogs" =~ /dog|cat|bird/;  # matches "cat"
247
248 Even though C<dog> is the first alternative in the second regex,
249 C<cat> is able to match earlier in the string.
250
251     "cats"          =~ /c|ca|cat|cats/; # matches "c"
252     "cats"          =~ /cats|cat|ca|c/; # matches "cats"
253
254 At a given character position, the first alternative that allows the
255 regex match to succeed will be the one that matches. Here, all the
256 alternatives match at the first string position, so the first matches.
257
258 =head2 Grouping things and hierarchical matching
259
260 The B<grouping> metacharacters C<()> allow a part of a regex to be
261 treated as a single unit.  Parts of a regex are grouped by enclosing
262 them in parentheses.  The regex C<house(cat|keeper)> means match
263 C<house> followed by either C<cat> or C<keeper>.  Some more examples
264 are
265
266     /(a|b)b/;    # matches 'ab' or 'bb'
267     /(^a|b)c/;   # matches 'ac' at start of string or 'bc' anywhere
268
269     /house(cat|)/;  # matches either 'housecat' or 'house'
270     /house(cat(s|)|)/;  # matches either 'housecats' or 'housecat' or
271                         # 'house'.  Note groups can be nested.
272
273     "20" =~ /(19|20|)\d\d/;  # matches the null alternative '()\d\d',
274                              # because '20\d\d' can't match
275
276 =head2 Extracting matches
277
278 The grouping metacharacters C<()> also allow the extraction of the
279 parts of a string that matched.  For each grouping, the part that
280 matched inside goes into the special variables C<$1>, C<$2>, etc.
281 They can be used just as ordinary variables:
282
283     # extract hours, minutes, seconds
284     $time =~ /(\d\d):(\d\d):(\d\d)/;  # match hh:mm:ss format
285     $hours = $1;
286     $minutes = $2;
287     $seconds = $3;
288
289 In list context, a match C</regex/> with groupings will return the
290 list of matched values C<($1,$2,...)>.  So we could rewrite it as
291
292     ($hours, $minutes, $second) = ($time =~ /(\d\d):(\d\d):(\d\d)/);
293
294 If the groupings in a regex are nested, C<$1> gets the group with the
295 leftmost opening parenthesis, C<$2> the next opening parenthesis,
296 etc.  For example, here is a complex regex and the matching variables
297 indicated below it:
298
299     /(ab(cd|ef)((gi)|j))/;
300      1  2      34
301
302 Associated with the matching variables C<$1>, C<$2>, ... are
303 the B<backreferences> C<\g1>, C<\g2>, ...  Backreferences are
304 matching variables that can be used I<inside> a regex:
305
306     /(\w\w\w)\s\g1/; # find sequences like 'the the' in string
307
308 C<$1>, C<$2>, ... should only be used outside of a regex, and C<\g1>,
309 C<\g2>, ... only inside a regex.
310
311 =head2 Matching repetitions
312
313 The B<quantifier> metacharacters C<?>, C<*>, C<+>, and C<{}> allow us
314 to determine the number of repeats of a portion of a regex we
315 consider to be a match.  Quantifiers are put immediately after the
316 character, character class, or grouping that we want to specify.  They
317 have the following meanings:
318
319 =over 4
320
321 =item *
322
323 C<a?> = match 'a' 1 or 0 times
324
325 =item *
326
327 C<a*> = match 'a' 0 or more times, i.e., any number of times
328
329 =item *
330
331 C<a+> = match 'a' 1 or more times, i.e., at least once
332
333 =item *
334
335 C<a{n,m}> = match at least C<n> times, but not more than C<m>
336 times.
337
338 =item *
339
340 C<a{n,}> = match at least C<n> or more times
341
342 =item *
343
344 C<a{n}> = match exactly C<n> times
345
346 =back
347
348 Here are some examples:
349
350     /[a-z]+\s+\d*/;  # match a lowercase word, at least some space, and
351                      # any number of digits
352     /(\w+)\s+\g1/;    # match doubled words of arbitrary length
353     $year =~ /^\d{2,4}$/;  # make sure year is at least 2 but not more
354                            # than 4 digits
355     $year =~ /^\d{4}$|^\d{2}$/;    # better match; throw out 3 digit dates
356
357 These quantifiers will try to match as much of the string as possible,
358 while still allowing the regex to match.  So we have
359
360     $x = 'the cat in the hat';
361     $x =~ /^(.*)(at)(.*)$/; # matches,
362                             # $1 = 'the cat in the h'
363                             # $2 = 'at'
364                             # $3 = ''   (0 matches)
365
366 The first quantifier C<.*> grabs as much of the string as possible
367 while still having the regex match. The second quantifier C<.*> has
368 no string left to it, so it matches 0 times.
369
370 =head2 More matching
371
372 There are a few more things you might want to know about matching
373 operators.
374 The global modifier C<//g> allows the matching operator to match
375 within a string as many times as possible.  In scalar context,
376 successive matches against a string will have C<//g> jump from match
377 to match, keeping track of position in the string as it goes along.
378 You can get or set the position with the C<pos()> function.
379 For example,
380
381     $x = "cat dog house"; # 3 words
382     while ($x =~ /(\w+)/g) {
383         print "Word is $1, ends at position ", pos $x, "\n";
384     }
385
386 prints
387
388     Word is cat, ends at position 3
389     Word is dog, ends at position 7
390     Word is house, ends at position 13
391
392 A failed match or changing the target string resets the position.  If
393 you don't want the position reset after failure to match, add the
394 C<//c>, as in C</regex/gc>.
395
396 In list context, C<//g> returns a list of matched groupings, or if
397 there are no groupings, a list of matches to the whole regex.  So
398
399     @words = ($x =~ /(\w+)/g);  # matches,
400                                 # $word[0] = 'cat'
401                                 # $word[1] = 'dog'
402                                 # $word[2] = 'house'
403
404 =head2 Search and replace
405
406 Search and replace is performed using C<s/regex/replacement/modifiers>.
407 The C<replacement> is a Perl double-quoted string that replaces in the
408 string whatever is matched with the C<regex>.  The operator C<=~> is
409 also used here to associate a string with C<s///>.  If matching
410 against C<$_>, the S<C<$_ =~>> can be dropped.  If there is a match,
411 C<s///> returns the number of substitutions made; otherwise it returns
412 false.  Here are a few examples:
413
414     $x = "Time to feed the cat!";
415     $x =~ s/cat/hacker/;   # $x contains "Time to feed the hacker!"
416     $y = "'quoted words'";
417     $y =~ s/^'(.*)'$/$1/;  # strip single quotes,
418                            # $y contains "quoted words"
419
420 With the C<s///> operator, the matched variables C<$1>, C<$2>, etc.
421 are immediately available for use in the replacement expression. With
422 the global modifier, C<s///g> will search and replace all occurrences
423 of the regex in the string:
424
425     $x = "I batted 4 for 4";
426     $x =~ s/4/four/;   # $x contains "I batted four for 4"
427     $x = "I batted 4 for 4";
428     $x =~ s/4/four/g;  # $x contains "I batted four for four"
429
430 The non-destructive modifier C<s///r> causes the result of the substitution
431 to be returned instead of modifying C<$_> (or whatever variable the
432 substitute was bound to with C<=~>):
433
434     $x = "I like dogs.";
435     $y = $x =~ s/dogs/cats/r;
436     print "$x $y\n"; # prints "I like dogs. I like cats."
437
438     $x = "Cats are great.";
439     print $x =~ s/Cats/Dogs/r =~ s/Dogs/Frogs/r =~ s/Frogs/Hedgehogs/r, "\n";
440     # prints "Hedgehogs are great."
441
442     @foo = map { s/[a-z]/X/r } qw(a b c 1 2 3);
443     # @foo is now qw(X X X 1 2 3)
444
445 The evaluation modifier C<s///e> wraps an C<eval{...}> around the
446 replacement string and the evaluated result is substituted for the
447 matched substring.  Some examples:
448
449     # reverse all the words in a string
450     $x = "the cat in the hat";
451     $x =~ s/(\w+)/reverse $1/ge;   # $x contains "eht tac ni eht tah"
452
453     # convert percentage to decimal
454     $x = "A 39% hit rate";
455     $x =~ s!(\d+)%!$1/100!e;       # $x contains "A 0.39 hit rate"
456
457 The last example shows that C<s///> can use other delimiters, such as
458 C<s!!!> and C<s{}{}>, and even C<s{}//>.  If single quotes are used
459 C<s'''>, then the regex and replacement are treated as single-quoted
460 strings.
461
462 =head2 The split operator
463
464 C<split /regex/, string> splits C<string> into a list of substrings
465 and returns that list.  The regex determines the character sequence
466 that C<string> is split with respect to.  For example, to split a
467 string into words, use
468
469     $x = "Calvin and Hobbes";
470     @word = split /\s+/, $x;  # $word[0] = 'Calvin'
471                               # $word[1] = 'and'
472                               # $word[2] = 'Hobbes'
473
474 To extract a comma-delimited list of numbers, use
475
476     $x = "1.618,2.718,   3.142";
477     @const = split /,\s*/, $x;  # $const[0] = '1.618'
478                                 # $const[1] = '2.718'
479                                 # $const[2] = '3.142'
480
481 If the empty regex C<//> is used, the string is split into individual
482 characters.  If the regex has groupings, then the list produced contains
483 the matched substrings from the groupings as well:
484
485     $x = "/usr/bin";
486     @parts = split m!(/)!, $x;  # $parts[0] = ''
487                                 # $parts[1] = '/'
488                                 # $parts[2] = 'usr'
489                                 # $parts[3] = '/'
490                                 # $parts[4] = 'bin'
491
492 Since the first character of $x matched the regex, C<split> prepended
493 an empty initial element to the list.
494
495 =head1 BUGS
496
497 None.
498
499 =head1 SEE ALSO
500
501 This is just a quick start guide.  For a more in-depth tutorial on
502 regexes, see L<perlretut> and for the reference page, see L<perlre>.
503
504 =head1 AUTHOR AND COPYRIGHT
505
506 Copyright (c) 2000 Mark Kvale
507 All rights reserved.
508
509 This document may be distributed under the same terms as Perl itself.
510
511 =head2 Acknowledgments
512
513 The author would like to thank Mark-Jason Dominus, Tom Christiansen,
514 Ilya Zakharevich, Brad Hughes, and Mike Giroux for all their helpful
515 comments.
516
517 =cut
518