Removal of a bunch of changes that don't merit perldelta integration
[perl.git] / pod / perldebguts.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 perldebguts - Guts of Perl debugging 
4
5 =head1 DESCRIPTION
6
7 This is not the perldebug(1) manpage, which tells you how to use
8 the debugger.  This manpage describes low-level details concerning
9 the debugger's internals, which range from difficult to impossible
10 to understand for anyone who isn't incredibly intimate with Perl's guts.
11 Caveat lector.
12
13 =head1 Debugger Internals
14
15 Perl has special debugging hooks at compile-time and run-time used
16 to create debugging environments.  These hooks are not to be confused
17 with the I<perl -Dxxx> command described in L<perlrun>, which is
18 usable only if a special Perl is built per the instructions in the
19 F<INSTALL> podpage in the Perl source tree.
20
21 For example, whenever you call Perl's built-in C<caller> function
22 from the package C<DB>, the arguments that the corresponding stack
23 frame was called with are copied to the C<@DB::args> array.  These
24 mechanisms are enabled by calling Perl with the B<-d> switch.
25 Specifically, the following additional features are enabled
26 (cf. L<perlvar/$^P>):
27
28 =over 4
29
30 =item *
31
32 Perl inserts the contents of C<$ENV{PERL5DB}> (or C<BEGIN {require
33 'perl5db.pl'}> if not present) before the first line of your program.
34
35 =item *
36
37 Each array C<@{"_<$filename"}> holds the lines of $filename for a
38 file compiled by Perl.  The same is also true for C<eval>ed strings
39 that contain subroutines, or which are currently being executed.
40 The $filename for C<eval>ed strings looks like C<(eval 34)>.
41 Code assertions in regexes look like C<(re_eval 19)>.
42
43 Values in this array are magical in numeric context: they compare
44 equal to zero only if the line is not breakable.
45
46 =item *
47
48 Each hash C<%{"_<$filename"}> contains breakpoints and actions keyed
49 by line number.  Individual entries (as opposed to the whole hash)
50 are settable.  Perl only cares about Boolean true here, although
51 the values used by F<perl5db.pl> have the form
52 C<"$break_condition\0$action">.  
53
54 The same holds for evaluated strings that contain subroutines, or
55 which are currently being executed.  The $filename for C<eval>ed strings
56 looks like C<(eval 34)> or  C<(re_eval 19)>.
57
58 =item *
59
60 Each scalar C<${"_<$filename"}> contains C<"_<$filename">.  This is
61 also the case for evaluated strings that contain subroutines, or
62 which are currently being executed.  The $filename for C<eval>ed
63 strings looks like C<(eval 34)> or C<(re_eval 19)>.
64
65 =item *
66
67 After each C<require>d file is compiled, but before it is executed,
68 C<DB::postponed(*{"_<$filename"})> is called if the subroutine
69 C<DB::postponed> exists.  Here, the $filename is the expanded name of
70 the C<require>d file, as found in the values of %INC.
71
72 =item *
73
74 After each subroutine C<subname> is compiled, the existence of
75 C<$DB::postponed{subname}> is checked.  If this key exists,
76 C<DB::postponed(subname)> is called if the C<DB::postponed> subroutine
77 also exists.
78
79 =item *
80
81 A hash C<%DB::sub> is maintained, whose keys are subroutine names
82 and whose values have the form C<filename:startline-endline>.
83 C<filename> has the form C<(eval 34)> for subroutines defined inside
84 C<eval>s, or C<(re_eval 19)> for those within regex code assertions.
85
86 =item *
87
88 When the execution of your program reaches a point that can hold a
89 breakpoint, the C<DB::DB()> subroutine is called if any of the variables
90 C<$DB::trace>, C<$DB::single>, or C<$DB::signal> is true.  These variables
91 are not C<local>izable.  This feature is disabled when executing
92 inside C<DB::DB()>, including functions called from it 
93 unless C<< $^D & (1<<30) >> is true.
94
95 =item *
96
97 When execution of the program reaches a subroutine call, a call to
98 C<&DB::sub>(I<args>) is made instead, with C<$DB::sub> holding the
99 name of the called subroutine. (This doesn't happen if the subroutine
100 was compiled in the C<DB> package.)
101
102 =back
103
104 Note that if C<&DB::sub> needs external data for it to work, no
105 subroutine call is possible without it. As an example, the standard
106 debugger's C<&DB::sub> depends on the C<$DB::deep> variable
107 (it defines how many levels of recursion deep into the debugger you can go
108 before a mandatory break).  If C<$DB::deep> is not defined, subroutine
109 calls are not possible, even though C<&DB::sub> exists.
110
111 =head2 Writing Your Own Debugger
112
113 =head3 Environment Variables
114
115 The C<PERL5DB> environment variable can be used to define a debugger.
116 For example, the minimal "working" debugger (it actually doesn't do anything)
117 consists of one line:
118
119   sub DB::DB {}
120
121 It can easily be defined like this:
122
123   $ PERL5DB="sub DB::DB {}" perl -d your-script
124
125 Another brief debugger, slightly more useful, can be created
126 with only the line:
127
128   sub DB::DB {print ++$i; scalar <STDIN>}
129
130 This debugger prints a number which increments for each statement
131 encountered and waits for you to hit a newline before continuing
132 to the next statement.
133
134 The following debugger is actually useful:
135
136   {
137     package DB;
138     sub DB  {}
139     sub sub {print ++$i, " $sub\n"; &$sub}
140   }
141
142 It prints the sequence number of each subroutine call and the name of the
143 called subroutine.  Note that C<&DB::sub> is being compiled into the
144 package C<DB> through the use of the C<package> directive.
145
146 When it starts, the debugger reads your rc file (F<./.perldb> or
147 F<~/.perldb> under Unix), which can set important options.
148 (A subroutine (C<&afterinit>) can be defined here as well; it is executed
149 after the debugger completes its own initialization.)
150
151 After the rc file is read, the debugger reads the PERLDB_OPTS
152 environment variable and uses it to set debugger options. The
153 contents of this variable are treated as if they were the argument
154 of an C<o ...> debugger command (q.v. in L<perldebug/Options>).
155
156 =head3 Debugger internal variables
157
158 In addition to the file and subroutine-related variables mentioned above,
159 the debugger also maintains various magical internal variables.
160
161 =over 4
162
163 =item *
164
165 C<@DB::dbline> is an alias for C<@{"::_<current_file"}>, which
166 holds the lines of the currently-selected file (compiled by Perl), either
167 explicitly chosen with the debugger's C<f> command, or implicitly by flow
168 of execution.
169
170 Values in this array are magical in numeric context: they compare
171 equal to zero only if the line is not breakable.
172
173 =item *
174
175 C<%DB::dbline>, is an alias for C<%{"::_<current_file"}>, which
176 contains breakpoints and actions keyed by line number in
177 the currently-selected file, either explicitly chosen with the
178 debugger's C<f> command, or implicitly by flow of execution.
179
180 As previously noted, individual entries (as opposed to the whole hash)
181 are settable.  Perl only cares about Boolean true here, although
182 the values used by F<perl5db.pl> have the form
183 C<"$break_condition\0$action">.
184
185 =back
186
187 =head3 Debugger customization functions
188
189 Some functions are provided to simplify customization.
190
191 =over 4
192
193 =item *
194
195 See L<perldebug/"Configurable Options"> for a description of options parsed by
196 C<DB::parse_options(string)>.
197
198 =item *
199
200 C<DB::dump_trace(skip[,count])> skips the specified number of frames
201 and returns a list containing information about the calling frames (all
202 of them, if C<count> is missing).  Each entry is reference to a hash
203 with keys C<context> (either C<.>, C<$>, or C<@>), C<sub> (subroutine
204 name, or info about C<eval>), C<args> (C<undef> or a reference to
205 an array), C<file>, and C<line>.
206
207 =item *
208
209 C<DB::print_trace(FH, skip[, count[, short]])> prints
210 formatted info about caller frames.  The last two functions may be
211 convenient as arguments to C<< < >>, C<< << >> commands.
212
213 =back
214
215 Note that any variables and functions that are not documented in
216 this manpages (or in L<perldebug>) are considered for internal   
217 use only, and as such are subject to change without notice.
218
219 =head1 Frame Listing Output Examples
220
221 The C<frame> option can be used to control the output of frame 
222 information.  For example, contrast this expression trace:
223
224  $ perl -de 42
225  Stack dump during die enabled outside of evals.
226
227  Loading DB routines from perl5db.pl patch level 0.94
228  Emacs support available.
229
230  Enter h or `h h' for help.
231
232  main::(-e:1):   0
233    DB<1> sub foo { 14 }
234
235    DB<2> sub bar { 3 }
236
237    DB<3> t print foo() * bar()
238  main::((eval 172):3):   print foo() + bar();
239  main::foo((eval 168):2):
240  main::bar((eval 170):2):
241  42
242
243 with this one, once the C<o>ption C<frame=2> has been set:
244
245    DB<4> o f=2
246                 frame = '2'
247    DB<5> t print foo() * bar()
248  3:      foo() * bar()
249  entering main::foo
250   2:     sub foo { 14 };
251  exited main::foo
252  entering main::bar
253   2:     sub bar { 3 };
254  exited main::bar
255  42
256
257 By way of demonstration, we present below a laborious listing
258 resulting from setting your C<PERLDB_OPTS> environment variable to
259 the value C<f=n N>, and running I<perl -d -V> from the command line.
260 Examples use various values of C<n> are shown to give you a feel
261 for the difference between settings.  Long those it may be, this
262 is not a complete listing, but only excerpts.
263
264 =over 4
265
266 =item 1
267
268   entering main::BEGIN
269    entering Config::BEGIN
270     Package lib/Exporter.pm.
271     Package lib/Carp.pm.
272    Package lib/Config.pm.
273    entering Config::TIEHASH
274    entering Exporter::import
275     entering Exporter::export
276   entering Config::myconfig
277    entering Config::FETCH
278    entering Config::FETCH
279    entering Config::FETCH
280    entering Config::FETCH
281
282 =item 2
283
284   entering main::BEGIN
285    entering Config::BEGIN
286     Package lib/Exporter.pm.
287     Package lib/Carp.pm.
288    exited Config::BEGIN
289    Package lib/Config.pm.
290    entering Config::TIEHASH
291    exited Config::TIEHASH
292    entering Exporter::import
293     entering Exporter::export
294     exited Exporter::export
295    exited Exporter::import
296   exited main::BEGIN
297   entering Config::myconfig
298    entering Config::FETCH
299    exited Config::FETCH
300    entering Config::FETCH
301    exited Config::FETCH
302    entering Config::FETCH
303
304 =item 3
305
306   in  $=main::BEGIN() from /dev/null:0
307    in  $=Config::BEGIN() from lib/Config.pm:2
308     Package lib/Exporter.pm.
309     Package lib/Carp.pm.
310    Package lib/Config.pm.
311    in  $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:644
312    in  $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
313     in  $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from li
314   in  @=Config::myconfig() from /dev/null:0
315    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'package') from lib/Config.pm:574
316    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'baserev') from lib/Config.pm:574
317    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'PERL_VERSION') from lib/Config.pm:574
318    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'PERL_SUBVERSION') from lib/Config.pm:574
319    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'osname') from lib/Config.pm:574
320    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'osvers') from lib/Config.pm:574
321
322 =item 4
323
324   in  $=main::BEGIN() from /dev/null:0
325    in  $=Config::BEGIN() from lib/Config.pm:2
326     Package lib/Exporter.pm.
327     Package lib/Carp.pm.
328    out $=Config::BEGIN() from lib/Config.pm:0
329    Package lib/Config.pm.
330    in  $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:644
331    out $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:644
332    in  $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
333     in  $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from lib/
334     out $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from lib/
335    out $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
336   out $=main::BEGIN() from /dev/null:0
337   in  @=Config::myconfig() from /dev/null:0
338    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'package') from lib/Config.pm:574
339    out $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'package') from lib/Config.pm:574
340    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'baserev') from lib/Config.pm:574
341    out $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'baserev') from lib/Config.pm:574
342    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'PERL_VERSION') from lib/Config.pm:574
343    out $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'PERL_VERSION') from lib/Config.pm:574
344    in  $=Config::FETCH(ref(Config), 'PERL_SUBVERSION') from lib/Config.pm:574
345
346 =item 5
347
348   in  $=main::BEGIN() from /dev/null:0
349    in  $=Config::BEGIN() from lib/Config.pm:2
350     Package lib/Exporter.pm.
351     Package lib/Carp.pm.
352    out $=Config::BEGIN() from lib/Config.pm:0
353    Package lib/Config.pm.
354    in  $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:644
355    out $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:644
356    in  $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
357     in  $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from lib/E
358     out $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from lib/E
359    out $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
360   out $=main::BEGIN() from /dev/null:0
361   in  @=Config::myconfig() from /dev/null:0
362    in  $=Config::FETCH('Config=HASH(0x1aa444)', 'package') from lib/Config.pm:574
363    out $=Config::FETCH('Config=HASH(0x1aa444)', 'package') from lib/Config.pm:574
364    in  $=Config::FETCH('Config=HASH(0x1aa444)', 'baserev') from lib/Config.pm:574
365    out $=Config::FETCH('Config=HASH(0x1aa444)', 'baserev') from lib/Config.pm:574
366
367 =item 6
368
369   in  $=CODE(0x15eca4)() from /dev/null:0
370    in  $=CODE(0x182528)() from lib/Config.pm:2
371     Package lib/Exporter.pm.
372    out $=CODE(0x182528)() from lib/Config.pm:0
373    scalar context return from CODE(0x182528): undef
374    Package lib/Config.pm.
375    in  $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:628
376    out $=Config::TIEHASH('Config') from lib/Config.pm:628
377    scalar context return from Config::TIEHASH:   empty hash
378    in  $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
379     in  $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from lib/Exporter.pm:171
380     out $=Exporter::export('Config', 'main', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from lib/Exporter.pm:171
381     scalar context return from Exporter::export: ''
382    out $=Exporter::import('Config', 'myconfig', 'config_vars') from /dev/null:0
383    scalar context return from Exporter::import: ''
384
385 =back
386
387 In all cases shown above, the line indentation shows the call tree.
388 If bit 2 of C<frame> is set, a line is printed on exit from a
389 subroutine as well.  If bit 4 is set, the arguments are printed
390 along with the caller info.  If bit 8 is set, the arguments are
391 printed even if they are tied or references.  If bit 16 is set, the
392 return value is printed, too.
393
394 When a package is compiled, a line like this
395
396     Package lib/Carp.pm.
397
398 is printed with proper indentation.
399
400 =head1 Debugging regular expressions
401
402 There are two ways to enable debugging output for regular expressions.
403
404 If your perl is compiled with C<-DDEBUGGING>, you may use the
405 B<-Dr> flag on the command line.
406
407 Otherwise, one can C<use re 'debug'>, which has effects at
408 compile time and run time.  It is not lexically scoped.
409
410 =head2 Compile-time output
411
412 The debugging output at compile time looks like this:
413
414   Compiling REx `[bc]d(ef*g)+h[ij]k$'
415   size 45 Got 364 bytes for offset annotations.
416   first at 1
417   rarest char g at 0
418   rarest char d at 0
419      1: ANYOF[bc](12)
420     12: EXACT <d>(14)
421     14: CURLYX[0] {1,32767}(28)
422     16:   OPEN1(18)
423     18:     EXACT <e>(20)
424     20:     STAR(23)
425     21:       EXACT <f>(0)
426     23:     EXACT <g>(25)
427     25:   CLOSE1(27)
428     27:   WHILEM[1/1](0)
429     28: NOTHING(29)
430     29: EXACT <h>(31)
431     31: ANYOF[ij](42)
432     42: EXACT <k>(44)
433     44: EOL(45)
434     45: END(0)
435   anchored `de' at 1 floating `gh' at 3..2147483647 (checking floating) 
436         stclass `ANYOF[bc]' minlen 7 
437   Offsets: [45]
438         1[4] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 5[1]
439         0[0] 12[1] 0[0] 6[1] 0[0] 7[1] 0[0] 9[1] 8[1] 0[0] 10[1] 0[0]
440         11[1] 0[0] 12[0] 12[0] 13[1] 0[0] 14[4] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0]
441         0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 18[1] 0[0] 19[1] 20[0]  
442   Omitting $` $& $' support.
443
444 The first line shows the pre-compiled form of the regex.  The second
445 shows the size of the compiled form (in arbitrary units, usually
446 4-byte words) and the total number of bytes allocated for the
447 offset/length table, usually 4+C<size>*8.  The next line shows the
448 label I<id> of the first node that does a match.
449
450 The 
451
452   anchored `de' at 1 floating `gh' at 3..2147483647 (checking floating) 
453         stclass `ANYOF[bc]' minlen 7 
454
455 line (split into two lines above) contains optimizer
456 information.  In the example shown, the optimizer found that the match 
457 should contain a substring C<de> at offset 1, plus substring C<gh>
458 at some offset between 3 and infinity.  Moreover, when checking for
459 these substrings (to abandon impossible matches quickly), Perl will check
460 for the substring C<gh> before checking for the substring C<de>.  The
461 optimizer may also use the knowledge that the match starts (at the
462 C<first> I<id>) with a character class, and no string 
463 shorter than 7 characters can possibly match.
464
465 The fields of interest which may appear in this line are
466
467 =over 4
468
469 =item C<anchored> I<STRING> C<at> I<POS>
470
471 =item C<floating> I<STRING> C<at> I<POS1..POS2>
472
473 See above.
474
475 =item C<matching floating/anchored>
476
477 Which substring to check first.
478
479 =item C<minlen>
480
481 The minimal length of the match.
482
483 =item C<stclass> I<TYPE>
484
485 Type of first matching node.
486
487 =item C<noscan>
488
489 Don't scan for the found substrings.
490
491 =item C<isall>
492
493 Means that the optimizer information is all that the regular
494 expression contains, and thus one does not need to enter the regex engine at
495 all.
496
497 =item C<GPOS>
498
499 Set if the pattern contains C<\G>.
500
501 =item C<plus> 
502
503 Set if the pattern starts with a repeated char (as in C<x+y>).
504
505 =item C<implicit>
506
507 Set if the pattern starts with C<.*>.
508
509 =item C<with eval> 
510
511 Set if the pattern contain eval-groups, such as C<(?{ code })> and
512 C<(??{ code })>.
513
514 =item C<anchored(TYPE)>
515
516 If the pattern may match only at a handful of places, (with C<TYPE>
517 being C<BOL>, C<MBOL>, or C<GPOS>.  See the table below.
518
519 =back
520
521 If a substring is known to match at end-of-line only, it may be
522 followed by C<$>, as in C<floating `k'$>.
523
524 The optimizer-specific information is used to avoid entering (a slow) regex
525 engine on strings that will not definitely match.  If the C<isall> flag
526 is set, a call to the regex engine may be avoided even when the optimizer
527 found an appropriate place for the match.
528
529 Above the optimizer section is the list of I<nodes> of the compiled
530 form of the regex.  Each line has format 
531
532 C<   >I<id>: I<TYPE> I<OPTIONAL-INFO> (I<next-id>)
533
534 =head2 Types of nodes
535
536 Here are the possible types, with short descriptions:
537
538     # TYPE arg-description [num-args] [longjump-len] DESCRIPTION
539
540     # Exit points
541     END         no      End of program.
542     SUCCEED     no      Return from a subroutine, basically.
543
544     # Anchors:
545     BOL         no      Match "" at beginning of line.
546     MBOL        no      Same, assuming multiline.
547     SBOL        no      Same, assuming singleline.
548     EOS         no      Match "" at end of string.
549     EOL         no      Match "" at end of line.
550     MEOL        no      Same, assuming multiline.
551     SEOL        no      Same, assuming singleline.
552     BOUND       no      Match "" at any word boundary
553     BOUNDL      no      Match "" at any word boundary
554     NBOUND      no      Match "" at any word non-boundary
555     NBOUNDL     no      Match "" at any word non-boundary
556     GPOS        no      Matches where last m//g left off.
557
558     # [Special] alternatives
559     ANY         no      Match any one character (except newline).
560     SANY        no      Match any one character.
561     ANYOF       sv      Match character in (or not in) this class.
562     ALNUM       no      Match any alphanumeric character
563     ALNUML      no      Match any alphanumeric char in locale
564     NALNUM      no      Match any non-alphanumeric character
565     NALNUML     no      Match any non-alphanumeric char in locale
566     SPACE       no      Match any whitespace character
567     SPACEL      no      Match any whitespace char in locale
568     NSPACE      no      Match any non-whitespace character
569     NSPACEL     no      Match any non-whitespace char in locale
570     DIGIT       no      Match any numeric character
571     NDIGIT      no      Match any non-numeric character
572
573     # BRANCH    The set of branches constituting a single choice are hooked
574     #           together with their "next" pointers, since precedence prevents
575     #           anything being concatenated to any individual branch.  The
576     #           "next" pointer of the last BRANCH in a choice points to the
577     #           thing following the whole choice.  This is also where the
578     #           final "next" pointer of each individual branch points; each
579     #           branch starts with the operand node of a BRANCH node.
580     #
581     BRANCH      node    Match this alternative, or the next...
582
583     # BACK      Normal "next" pointers all implicitly point forward; BACK
584     #           exists to make loop structures possible.
585     # not used
586     BACK        no      Match "", "next" ptr points backward.
587
588     # Literals
589     EXACT       sv      Match this string (preceded by length).
590     EXACTF      sv      Match this string, folded (prec. by length).
591     EXACTFL     sv      Match this string, folded in locale (w/len).
592
593     # Do nothing
594     NOTHING     no      Match empty string.
595     # A variant of above which delimits a group, thus stops optimizations
596     TAIL        no      Match empty string. Can jump here from outside.
597
598     # STAR,PLUS '?', and complex '*' and '+', are implemented as circular
599     #           BRANCH structures using BACK.  Simple cases (one character
600     #           per match) are implemented with STAR and PLUS for speed
601     #           and to minimize recursive plunges.
602     #
603     STAR        node    Match this (simple) thing 0 or more times.
604     PLUS        node    Match this (simple) thing 1 or more times.
605
606     CURLY       sv 2    Match this simple thing {n,m} times.
607     CURLYN      no 2    Match next-after-this simple thing 
608     #                   {n,m} times, set parens.
609     CURLYM      no 2    Match this medium-complex thing {n,m} times.
610     CURLYX      sv 2    Match this complex thing {n,m} times.
611
612     # This terminator creates a loop structure for CURLYX
613     WHILEM      no      Do curly processing and see if rest matches.
614
615     # OPEN,CLOSE,GROUPP ...are numbered at compile time.
616     OPEN        num 1   Mark this point in input as start of #n.
617     CLOSE       num 1   Analogous to OPEN.
618
619     REF         num 1   Match some already matched string
620     REFF        num 1   Match already matched string, folded
621     REFFL       num 1   Match already matched string, folded in loc.
622
623     # grouping assertions
624     IFMATCH     off 1 2 Succeeds if the following matches.
625     UNLESSM     off 1 2 Fails if the following matches.
626     SUSPEND     off 1 1 "Independent" sub-regex.
627     IFTHEN      off 1 1 Switch, should be preceded by switcher .
628     GROUPP      num 1   Whether the group matched.
629
630     # Support for long regex
631     LONGJMP     off 1 1 Jump far away.
632     BRANCHJ     off 1 1 BRANCH with long offset.
633
634     # The heavy worker
635     EVAL        evl 1   Execute some Perl code.
636
637     # Modifiers
638     MINMOD      no      Next operator is not greedy.
639     LOGICAL     no      Next opcode should set the flag only.
640
641     # This is not used yet
642     RENUM       off 1 1 Group with independently numbered parens.
643
644     # This is not really a node, but an optimized away piece of a "long" node.
645     # To simplify debugging output, we mark it as if it were a node
646     OPTIMIZED   off     Placeholder for dump.
647
648 =for unprinted-credits
649 Next section M-J. Dominus (mjd-perl-patch+@plover.com) 20010421
650
651 Following the optimizer information is a dump of the offset/length
652 table, here split across several lines:
653
654   Offsets: [45]
655         1[4] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 5[1]
656         0[0] 12[1] 0[0] 6[1] 0[0] 7[1] 0[0] 9[1] 8[1] 0[0] 10[1] 0[0]
657         11[1] 0[0] 12[0] 12[0] 13[1] 0[0] 14[4] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0]
658         0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 0[0] 18[1] 0[0] 19[1] 20[0]  
659
660 The first line here indicates that the offset/length table contains 45
661 entries.  Each entry is a pair of integers, denoted by C<offset[length]>.
662 Entries are numbered starting with 1, so entry #1 here is C<1[4]> and
663 entry #12 is C<5[1]>.  C<1[4]> indicates that the node labeled C<1:>
664 (the C<1: ANYOF[bc]>) begins at character position 1 in the
665 pre-compiled form of the regex, and has a length of 4 characters.
666 C<5[1]> in position 12 
667 indicates that the node labeled C<12:>
668 (the C<< 12: EXACT <d> >>) begins at character position 5 in the
669 pre-compiled form of the regex, and has a length of 1 character.
670 C<12[1]> in position 14 
671 indicates that the node labeled C<14:>
672 (the C<< 14: CURLYX[0] {1,32767} >>) begins at character position 12 in the
673 pre-compiled form of the regex, and has a length of 1 character---that
674 is, it corresponds to the C<+> symbol in the precompiled regex.
675
676 C<0[0]> items indicate that there is no corresponding node.
677
678 =head2 Run-time output
679
680 First of all, when doing a match, one may get no run-time output even
681 if debugging is enabled.  This means that the regex engine was never
682 entered and that all of the job was therefore done by the optimizer.
683
684 If the regex engine was entered, the output may look like this:
685
686   Matching `[bc]d(ef*g)+h[ij]k$' against `abcdefg__gh__'
687     Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
688      2 <ab> <cdefg__gh_>    |  1: ANYOF
689      3 <abc> <defg__gh_>    | 11: EXACT <d>
690      4 <abcd> <efg__gh_>    | 13: CURLYX {1,32767}
691      4 <abcd> <efg__gh_>    | 26:   WHILEM
692                                 0 out of 1..32767  cc=effff31c
693      4 <abcd> <efg__gh_>    | 15:     OPEN1
694      4 <abcd> <efg__gh_>    | 17:     EXACT <e>
695      5 <abcde> <fg__gh_>    | 19:     STAR
696                              EXACT <f> can match 1 times out of 32767...
697     Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=3
698      6 <bcdef> <g__gh__>    | 22:       EXACT <g>
699      7 <bcdefg> <__gh__>    | 24:       CLOSE1
700      7 <bcdefg> <__gh__>    | 26:       WHILEM
701                                     1 out of 1..32767  cc=effff31c
702     Setting an EVAL scope, savestack=12
703      7 <bcdefg> <__gh__>    | 15:         OPEN1
704      7 <bcdefg> <__gh__>    | 17:         EXACT <e>
705        restoring \1 to 4(4)..7
706                                     failed, try continuation...
707      7 <bcdefg> <__gh__>    | 27:         NOTHING
708      7 <bcdefg> <__gh__>    | 28:         EXACT <h>
709                                     failed...
710                                 failed...
711
712 The most significant information in the output is about the particular I<node>
713 of the compiled regex that is currently being tested against the target string.
714 The format of these lines is
715
716 C<    >I<STRING-OFFSET> <I<PRE-STRING>> <I<POST-STRING>>   |I<ID>:  I<TYPE>
717
718 The I<TYPE> info is indented with respect to the backtracking level.
719 Other incidental information appears interspersed within.
720
721 =head1 Debugging Perl memory usage
722
723 Perl is a profligate wastrel when it comes to memory use.  There
724 is a saying that to estimate memory usage of Perl, assume a reasonable
725 algorithm for memory allocation, multiply that estimate by 10, and
726 while you still may miss the mark, at least you won't be quite so
727 astonished.  This is not absolutely true, but may provide a good
728 grasp of what happens.
729
730 Assume that an integer cannot take less than 20 bytes of memory, a
731 float cannot take less than 24 bytes, a string cannot take less
732 than 32 bytes (all these examples assume 32-bit architectures, the
733 result are quite a bit worse on 64-bit architectures).  If a variable
734 is accessed in two of three different ways (which require an integer,
735 a float, or a string), the memory footprint may increase yet another
736 20 bytes.  A sloppy malloc(3) implementation can inflate these
737 numbers dramatically.
738
739 On the opposite end of the scale, a declaration like
740
741   sub foo;
742
743 may take up to 500 bytes of memory, depending on which release of Perl
744 you're running.
745
746 Anecdotal estimates of source-to-compiled code bloat suggest an
747 eightfold increase.  This means that the compiled form of reasonable
748 (normally commented, properly indented etc.) code will take
749 about eight times more space in memory than the code took
750 on disk.
751
752 The B<-DL> command-line switch is obsolete since circa Perl 5.6.0
753 (it was available only if Perl was built with C<-DDEBUGGING>).
754 The switch was used to track Perl's memory allocations and possible
755 memory leaks.  These days the use of malloc debugging tools like
756 F<Purify> or F<valgrind> is suggested instead.  See also
757 L<perlhack/PERL_MEM_LOG>.
758
759 One way to find out how much memory is being used by Perl data
760 structures is to install the Devel::Size module from CPAN: it gives
761 you the minimum number of bytes required to store a particular data
762 structure.  Please be mindful of the difference between the size()
763 and total_size().
764
765 If Perl has been compiled using Perl's malloc you can analyze Perl
766 memory usage by setting the $ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS}.
767
768 =head2 Using C<$ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS}>
769
770 If your perl is using Perl's malloc() and was compiled with the
771 necessary switches (this is the default), then it will print memory
772 usage statistics after compiling your code when C<< $ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS}
773 > 1 >>, and before termination of the program when C<<
774 $ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS} >= 1 >>.  The report format is similar to
775 the following example:
776
777   $ PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS=2 perl -e "require Carp"
778   Memory allocation statistics after compilation: (buckets 4(4)..8188(8192)
779      14216 free:   130   117    28     7     9   0   2     2   1 0 0
780                 437    61    36     0     5
781      60924 used:   125   137   161    55     7   8   6    16   2 0 1
782                  74   109   304    84    20
783   Total sbrk(): 77824/21:119. Odd ends: pad+heads+chain+tail: 0+636+0+2048.
784   Memory allocation statistics after execution:   (buckets 4(4)..8188(8192)
785      30888 free:   245    78    85    13     6   2   1     3   2 0 1
786                 315   162    39    42    11
787     175816 used:   265   176  1112   111    26  22  11    27   2 1 1
788                 196   178  1066   798    39
789   Total sbrk(): 215040/47:145. Odd ends: pad+heads+chain+tail: 0+2192+0+6144.
790
791 It is possible to ask for such a statistic at arbitrary points in
792 your execution using the mstat() function out of the standard
793 Devel::Peek module.
794
795 Here is some explanation of that format:
796
797 =over 4
798
799 =item C<buckets SMALLEST(APPROX)..GREATEST(APPROX)>
800
801 Perl's malloc() uses bucketed allocations.  Every request is rounded
802 up to the closest bucket size available, and a bucket is taken from
803 the pool of buckets of that size.
804
805 The line above describes the limits of buckets currently in use.
806 Each bucket has two sizes: memory footprint and the maximal size
807 of user data that can fit into this bucket.  Suppose in the above
808 example that the smallest bucket were size 4.  The biggest bucket
809 would have usable size 8188, and the memory footprint would be 8192.
810
811 In a Perl built for debugging, some buckets may have negative usable
812 size.  This means that these buckets cannot (and will not) be used.
813 For larger buckets, the memory footprint may be one page greater
814 than a power of 2.  If so, case the corresponding power of two is
815 printed in the C<APPROX> field above.
816
817 =item Free/Used
818
819 The 1 or 2 rows of numbers following that correspond to the number
820 of buckets of each size between C<SMALLEST> and C<GREATEST>.  In
821 the first row, the sizes (memory footprints) of buckets are powers
822 of two--or possibly one page greater.  In the second row, if present,
823 the memory footprints of the buckets are between the memory footprints
824 of two buckets "above".
825
826 For example, suppose under the previous example, the memory footprints
827 were
828
829      free:    8     16    32    64    128  256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192
830            4     12    24    48    80
831
832 With non-C<DEBUGGING> perl, the buckets starting from C<128> have
833 a 4-byte overhead, and thus an 8192-long bucket may take up to
834 8188-byte allocations.
835
836 =item C<Total sbrk(): SBRKed/SBRKs:CONTINUOUS>
837
838 The first two fields give the total amount of memory perl sbrk(2)ed
839 (ess-broken? :-) and number of sbrk(2)s used.  The third number is
840 what perl thinks about continuity of returned chunks.  So long as
841 this number is positive, malloc() will assume that it is probable
842 that sbrk(2) will provide continuous memory.
843
844 Memory allocated by external libraries is not counted.
845
846 =item C<pad: 0>
847
848 The amount of sbrk(2)ed memory needed to keep buckets aligned.
849
850 =item C<heads: 2192>
851
852 Although memory overhead of bigger buckets is kept inside the bucket, for
853 smaller buckets, it is kept in separate areas.  This field gives the
854 total size of these areas.
855
856 =item C<chain: 0>
857
858 malloc() may want to subdivide a bigger bucket into smaller buckets.
859 If only a part of the deceased bucket is left unsubdivided, the rest
860 is kept as an element of a linked list.  This field gives the total
861 size of these chunks.
862
863 =item C<tail: 6144>
864
865 To minimize the number of sbrk(2)s, malloc() asks for more memory.  This
866 field gives the size of the yet unused part, which is sbrk(2)ed, but
867 never touched.
868
869 =back
870
871 =head1 SEE ALSO
872
873 L<perldebug>,
874 L<perlguts>,
875 L<perlrun>
876 L<re>,
877 and
878 L<Devel::DProf>.