perllocale: Nit, and clarification
authorKarl Williamson <public@khwilliamson.com>
Thu, 5 Dec 2013 02:47:19 +0000 (19:47 -0700)
committerKarl Williamson <public@khwilliamson.com>
Thu, 5 Dec 2013 02:52:39 +0000 (19:52 -0700)
pod/perllocale.pod

index 5bcaf4d..b44cb3a 100644 (file)
@@ -351,7 +351,9 @@ example.
 If no second argument is provided and the category is something other
 than LC_ALL, the function returns a string naming the current locale
 for the category.  You can use this value as the second argument in a
-subsequent call to C<setlocale()>.
+subsequent call to C<setlocale()>, B<but> on some platforms the string
+is opaque, not something that most people would be able to decipher as
+to what locale it means.
 
 If no second argument is provided and the category is LC_ALL, the
 result is implementation-dependent.  It may be a string of
@@ -376,7 +378,7 @@ be noticed, depending on your system's C library.
 Note that Perl ignores the current C<LC_CTYPE> and C<LC_COLLATE> locales
 within the scope of a C<use locale ':not_characters'>.
 
-If C<set_locale()> fails for some reason (for example an attempt to set
+If C<set_locale()> fails for some reason (for example, an attempt to set
 to a locale unknown to the system), the locale for the category is not
 changed, and the function returns C<undef>.