Fix perlebcdic for for 80 column tty; fix C<>s
authorKarl Williamson <khw@khw-desktop.(none)>
Wed, 5 May 2010 18:03:16 +0000 (12:03 -0600)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Wed, 17 Aug 2011 01:43:34 +0000 (18:43 -0700)
Two C<>'s were unclosed
(cherry picked from commit c72e675e8b42d658ffa4770f8d9c87ab4870aceb)

[This was cherry-picked as it is a prerequisite for d5cd9e7.  It still
 follows the policy, which allows for fixes to broken markup.]

pod/perlebcdic.pod

index f178912..1f79f6e 100644 (file)
@@ -122,8 +122,8 @@ The problem is: which code points to use for code points less than 256?
 In EBCDIC, for the low 256 the EBCDIC code points are used.  This
 means that the equivalences
 
-       pack("U", ord($character)) eq $character
-       unpack("U", $character) == ord $character
+    pack("U", ord($character)) eq $character
+    unpack("U", $character) == ord $character
 
 will hold.  (If Unicode code points were applied consistently over
 all the possible code points, pack("U",ord("A")) would in EBCDIC
@@ -180,23 +180,23 @@ to translate from EBCDIC to Latin-1 code points.
 Encode knows about more EBCDIC character sets than Perl can currently
 be compiled to run on.
 
-       use Encode 'from_to';
+   use Encode 'from_to';
 
-       my %ebcdic = ( 176 => 'cp37', 95 => 'cp1047', 106 => 'posix-bc' );
+   my %ebcdic = ( 176 => 'cp37', 95 => 'cp1047', 106 => 'posix-bc' );
 
-       # $a is in EBCDIC code points
-       from_to($a, $ebcdic{ord '^'}, 'latin1');
-       # $a is ISO 8859-1 code points
+   # $a is in EBCDIC code points
+   from_to($a, $ebcdic{ord '^'}, 'latin1');
+   # $a is ISO 8859-1 code points
 
 and from Latin-1 code points to EBCDIC code points
 
-       use Encode 'from_to';
+   use Encode 'from_to';
 
-       my %ebcdic = ( 176 => 'cp37', 95 => 'cp1047', 106 => 'posix-bc' );
+   my %ebcdic = ( 176 => 'cp37', 95 => 'cp1047', 106 => 'posix-bc' );
 
-       # $a is ISO 8859-1 code points
-       from_to($a, 'latin1', $ebcdic{ord '^'});
-       # $a is in EBCDIC code points
+   # $a is ISO 8859-1 code points
+   from_to($a, 'latin1', $ebcdic{ord '^'});
+   # $a is in EBCDIC code points
 
 For doing I/O it is suggested that you use the autotranslating features
 of PerlIO, see L<perluniintro>.
@@ -263,20 +263,22 @@ might want to write:
 
 =back
 
-    open(FH,"<perlebcdic.pod") or die "Could not open perlebcdic.pod: $!";
-    while (<FH>) {
-        if (/(.{43})(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)/)  {
-            if ($7 ne '' && $9 ne '') {
-                printf("%s%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%-3o.%-5o%-3o.%o\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9);
-            }
-            elsif ($7 ne '') {
-                printf("%s%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%-3o.%-5o%o\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8);
-            }
-            else {
-                printf("%s%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%o\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$8);
-            }
-        }
-    }
+ open(FH,"<perlebcdic.pod") or die "Could not open perlebcdic.pod: $!";
+ while (<FH>) {
+     if (/(.{43})(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)/)  {
+         if ($7 ne '' && $9 ne '') {
+             printf("%s%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%-3o.%-5o%-3o.%o\n",
+                                        $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9);
+         }
+         elsif ($7 ne '') {
+             printf("%s%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%-3o.%-5o%o\n",
+                                           $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8);
+         }
+         else {
+             printf("%s%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%-9o%o\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$8);
+         }
+     }
+ }
 
 If you would rather see this table listing hexadecimal values then
 run the table through:
@@ -298,20 +300,22 @@ Or, in order to retain the UTF-x code points in hexadecimal:
 
 =back
 
-    open(FH,"<perlebcdic.pod") or die "Could not open perlebcdic.pod: $!";
-    while (<FH>) {
-        if (/(.{43})(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)/)  {
-            if ($7 ne '' && $9 ne '') {
-                printf("%s%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%-2X.%-6X%-2X.%X\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9);
-            }
-            elsif ($7 ne '') {
-                printf("%s%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%-2X.%-6X%X\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8);
-            }
-            else {
-                printf("%s%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%X\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$8);
-            }
-        }
-    }
+ open(FH,"<perlebcdic.pod") or die "Could not open perlebcdic.pod: $!";
+ while (<FH>) {
+     if (/(.{43})(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)\s+(\d+)\.?(\d*)/)  {
+         if ($7 ne '' && $9 ne '') {
+             printf("%s%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%-2X.%-6X%-2X.%X\n",
+                                           $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9);
+         }
+         elsif ($7 ne '') {
+             printf("%s%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%-2X.%-6X%X\n",
+                                              $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8);
+         }
+         else {
+             printf("%s%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%-9X%X\n",$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$8);
+         }
+     }
+ }
 
 
                                       ISO 8859-1  CCSID    CCSID                    CCSID 1047
@@ -583,7 +587,7 @@ ASCII + Latin-1 order then run the table through:
 
 =back
 
-    perl -ne 'if(/.{43}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}/)'\
+ perl -ne 'if(/.{43}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}/)'\
      -e '{push(@l,$_)}' \
      -e 'END{print map{$_->[0]}' \
      -e '          sort{$a->[1] <=> $b->[1]}' \
@@ -598,7 +602,7 @@ If you would rather see it in CCSID 1047 order then change the number
 
 =back
 
-    perl -ne 'if(/.{43}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}/)'\
+ perl -ne 'if(/.{43}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}/)'\
      -e '{push(@l,$_)}' \
      -e 'END{print map{$_->[0]}' \
      -e '          sort{$a->[1] <=> $b->[1]}' \
@@ -613,7 +617,7 @@ If you would rather see it in POSIX-BC order then change the number
 
 =back
 
-    perl -ne 'if(/.{43}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}/)'\
+ perl -ne 'if(/.{43}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}\s{6,8}\d{1,3}/)'\
      -e '{push(@l,$_)}' \
      -e 'END{print map{$_->[0]}' \
      -e '          sort{$a->[1] <=> $b->[1]}' \
@@ -756,8 +760,8 @@ an example adapted from the one in L<perlop>:
 
 An interesting property of the 32 C0 control characters
 in the ASCII table is that they can "literally" be constructed
-as control characters in perl, e.g. C<(chr(0) eq C<\c@>)> 
-C<(chr(1) eq C<\cA>)>, and so on.  Perl on EBCDIC platforms has been 
+as control characters in perl, e.g. C<(chr(0)> eq C<\c@>)>
+C<(chr(1)> eq C<\cA>)>, and so on.  Perl on EBCDIC platforms has been
 ported to take C<\c@> to chr(0) and C<\cA> to chr(1), etc. as well, but the
 thirty three characters that result depend on which code page you are
 using.  The table below uses the standard acronyms for the controls.
@@ -771,7 +775,7 @@ or regex, as it will absorb the terminator.   But C<\c\I<X>> is a C<FILE
 SEPARATOR> concatenated with I<X> for all I<X>.
 
  chr   ord   8859-1    0037    1047 && POSIX-BC     
- ------------------------------------------------------------------------
+ -----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \c?   127   <DEL>       "            "    
  \c@     0   <NUL>     <NUL>        <NUL>
  \cA     1   <SOH>     <SOH>        <SOH> 
@@ -1030,7 +1034,7 @@ letters compared to the digits.  If sorted on an ASCII based platform the
 two letter abbreviation for a physician comes before the two letter
 for drive, that is:
 
-    @sorted = sort(qw(Dr. dr.));  # @sorted holds ('Dr.','dr.') on ASCII,
+ @sorted = sort(qw(Dr. dr.));  # @sorted holds ('Dr.','dr.') on ASCII,
                                   # but ('dr.','Dr.') on EBCDIC
 
 The property of lower case before uppercase letters in EBCDIC is